Charles Poynton

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Charles A. Poynton is a Canadian technical consultant and writer based in Toronto. [1] He gives seminars on digital video systems and has written two books, A Technical Introduction to Digital Video (Wiley, 1996; ISBN   0-471-12253-X) and Digital Video and HDTV: Algorithms and Interfaces (Morgan Kaufmann, 2003; ISBN   1-55860-792-7). He is currently a columnist at Spectracal.com. [2]

Poynton is a Fellow of SMPTE, and was awarded the David Sarnoff Gold Medal in 1993 for his work to "integrate video technology with computing and communications". [3]

He is a popular teacher of seminars and travels widely for this purpose. [4]

In 1981, he founded Poynton Vector Corporation to design and build digital television processing equipment for NASA's Johnson Space Center. From 1985 to 1995, this equipment converted the field-sequential color television signal from the Space Shuttle to NTSC, for viewing, recording, and distribution to television networks. [5]

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Bernard J. Lechner

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DCI-P3

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References

  1. "Charles Poynton - Freelance". Poynton.com. 2011-02-08. Retrieved 2014-02-10.
  2. "Portrait Displays - Home". Portrait Displays.
  3. Team, SMPTE Marketing. "David Sarnoff Medal Recipients | Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers". www.smpte.org.
  4. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-09-03. Retrieved 2010-07-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. "Charles Poynton - Biography". Poynton.com. 2005-04-28. Retrieved 2014-02-10.