Chase Manhattan Bank Money Museum

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The Chase Manhattan Bank Money Museum was a money museum in New York City from 1928 to 1977.

History

The core of the collection was acquired by the Chase National Bank from numismatist Farran Zerbe in 1928, who became the first curator of the new museum, and contained legal tender in a variety of forms, including wampum, ancient and modern coins, and paper money.

In 1939, Zerbe retired and Vernon L. Brown became the curator of the museum. [1] After several moves, the museum opened at Rockefeller Center on Sixth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City, on July 10, 1956. [2] After Vernon Brown left the museum in 1963, Don Taxay was appointed curator in April 1964. [3]

The museum closed in 1977 and most of the collection (approximately 26,000 objects) was donated to the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution on 16 January 1978. Some of the collection went to the American Numismatic Society, including an 1804 U.S. dollar. An 1862 $1 Legal Tender note with Serial Number 1 (the first dollar bill issued by the United States) is now in the Chase Bank. [4]

Gene Hessler was the last curator of the museum, serving from 1967 to 1975. [5]

Related Research Articles

Numismatics is the study or collection of currency, including coins, tokens, paper money and related objects. While numismatists are often characterised as students or collectors of coins, the discipline also includes the broader study of money and other payment media used to resolve debts and the exchange of goods. Early money used by people is referred to as "Odd and Curious", but the use of other goods in barter exchange is excluded, even where used as a circulating currency. As an example, the Kyrgyz people used horses as the principal currency unit and gave small change in lambskins; the lambskins may be suitable for numismatic study, but the horses are not. Many objects have been used for centuries, such as cowry shells, precious metals, cocoa beans, large stones, and gems.

United States Note

A United States Note, also known as a Legal Tender Note, is a type of paper money that was issued from 1862 to 1971 in the U.S. Having been current for 109 years, they were issued for longer than any other form of U.S. paper money. They were known popularly as "greenbacks", a name inherited from the earlier greenbacks, the Demand Notes, that they replaced in 1862. Often termed Legal Tender Notes, they were named United States Notes by the First Legal Tender Act, which authorized them as a form of fiat currency. During the 1860s the so-called second obligation on the reverse of the notes stated:

This Note is a Legal Tender for All Debts Public and Private Except Duties On Imports And Interest On The Public Debt; And Is Redeemable In Payment Of All Loans Made To The United States.

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American Numismatic Association

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Demand Note

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Farran Zerbe

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Theodore "Ted" Fetter was a Broadway lyricist who contributed material to such revues as The Show Is On (1936) and Billy Rose's Aquacade (1939), but is best remembered for co-writing the song "Taking a Chance on Love," introduced in the 1940 musical comedy Cabin in the Sky.

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John M. Mossman Lock Museum

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National Numismatic Collection National coin cabinet of the United States

The National Numismatic Collection is the national coin cabinet of the United States. The collection is part of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

Don Taxay

Don Paul Taxay was an American numismatist and historian, known for the reference works he composed, and for his disappearance at the height of his career.

Lewis and Clark Exposition gold dollar Commemorative United States coin

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Gene Hessler is an American musician and numismatist, specialising in paper money.

References

  1. "Vernon L. Brown: Biography". Newman Numismatic Portal. Retrieved 7 December 2019.
  2. "Exhibit of Money in New Quarters". The New York Times. 11 July 1956. p. 40. ProQuest   113608613.
  3. Smith, Pete (2018). American Numismatic Biographies. pp.  333 via Archive.org.
  4. "ARCHER - Authorities: Chase Manhattan Bank Money Museum (chase_manhattan_bank_money_museum)". numismatics.org. Retrieved 7 Feb 2018.
  5. Chase Manhattan Money Museum History, The E-Sylum, vol. 7, no. 31 (1 Aug 2004), article 16. http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v07n31a16.html Retrieved 7 Feb 2018.

Coordinates: 40°45′29″N73°58′41″W / 40.758°N 73.978°W / 40.758; -73.978