Computerized maintenance management system

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Steps involved in a CMMS plan CMMS Plan Steps.jpg
Steps involved in a CMMS plan

Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS), also known as computerized maintenance management information system (CMMIS), is a software package that maintains a computer database of information about an organization's maintenance operations. [2] This information is intended to help maintenance workers do their jobs more effectively (for example, determining which machines require maintenance and which storerooms contain the spare parts they need) and to help management make informed decisions (for example, calculating the cost of machine breakdown repair versus preventive maintenance for each machine, possibly leading to better allocation of resources).

CMMS data may also be used to verify regulatory compliance. To properly control the maintenance of a facility, information is required to analyze what is occurring. Manually this requires a tremendous amount of effort and time. A CMMS also allows for record keeping, to track completed and assigned tasks in a timely and cost-effective manner. [3] In recognition of this, companies have started using CMMS extensively to better control and organize maintenance management. The different steps of implementing a CMMS plan have been described in the diagram.

A CMMS offers multiple core maintenance functionalities. It is not limited to manufacturing but expands to facilities, utilities, fleet, hospitals, sports arenas and more where any type of equipment/assets are subject to repair and need maintenance. With improved technology and increasing competition, more and more companies are switching to CMMS vs using manual methods to track and organize information. The different components of a CMMS include but are not limited to:

  1. Equipment data management
  2. Preventive maintenance
  3. Predictive maintenance
  4. Labor
  5. Work order system
  6. Scheduling/planning
  7. Vendor management
  8. Inventory control
  9. Purchasing
  10. Budgeting
  11. Asset tracking

CMMS packages may be used by any organization that must perform maintenance on equipment, assets and property. Some CMMS products focus on particular industry sectors (e.g. the maintenance of vehicle fleets or health care facilities). Other products aim to be more general.

CMMS packages can produce status reports and documents giving details or summaries of maintenance activities. The more sophisticated the package, the more extensive analysis facilities have available.

Many CMMS packages can be either cloud-based, meaning they are hosted by the company selling the product on an outside server, or on-premises based, meaning that the company buying the software hosts the product on its own server.

See also

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References

  1. Bagadia, Kishan (2010-07-19). Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Made Easy: How to Evaluate, Select, and Manage CMMS. McGraw Hill Professional. ISBN   9780071491273.
  2. Cato, William; Mobley, Keith (2002). Computer-managed Maintenance Systems: A Step-by-step Guide to Effective Management of Maintenance, Labor, and Inventory. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 33. ISBN   0-7506-7473-3.
  3. Wireman, Terry (1994). Computerized Maintenance Management Systems. Industrial Press Inc. p. 7. ISBN   9780831130541.