Desire (1920 film)

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Desire
Directed by George Edwardes-Hall
Written byGeorge Edwardes-Hall
Honoré de Balzac (novel)
Produced by Edward Godal
Starring Dennis Neilson-Terry
Yvonne Arnaud
Christine Maitland
Production
company
Distributed by Butcher's Film Service
Release date
January 1920
Running time
54 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguagesSilent
English intertitles

Desire (aka The Magic Skin) is a 1920 British silent fantasy film directed by George Edwardes-Hall, produced by Edward Godal, and starring Dennis Neilson-Terry, Yvonne Arnaud and Christine Maitland. [1] The film was known in England as The Magic Skin. The screenplay was based on the 1831 Honoré de Balzac novel Le Peau de Chagrin , which strangely was adapted to film three different times in 1920 alone, the other two being released as The Dream Cheater and Narayama. [2]

Contents

Born in 1872, director Hall relocated from his birthplace Brooklyn, New York to England later in life, then moved to California, where he died in 1922. He actually did more screenwriting than directing during his career, and also wrote a number of plays and short stories. [3]

Plot

A man named Valentin obtains a magic shagreen, a leather hide made from the skin of a wild jackass. The shagreen is said to grant its owner's every wish, but at the price of his immortal soul.

Cast

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The Monster of Frankenstein was a 1920 Italian silent horror film, produced by Luciano Albertini, directed by Eugenio Testa, starring Luciano Albertini, Aldo Mezzanotte and Umberto Guarracino, and is an adaptation of Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. It was one of a very few Italian horror films produced in the silent era since after Benito Mussolini seized control of the country, horror films were strictly forbidden. The Mary Shelley novel had been filmed twice before during the silent era, as Thomas Edison's Frankenstein (1910) and as Life Without Soul (1915).

The Lost Shadow is a 1921 German silent film directed by Rochus Gliese and starring Paul Wegener, Wilhelm Bendow and Adele Sandrock. The cinematographer was Karl Freund. The film's sets were designed by the art director Kurt Richter. It was shot at the Tempelhof Studios in Berlin. For some reason, the film was only released in the US in 1928. It is today considered a lost film.

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The Phantom of the Moulin Rouge is a 1925 French silent comedy fantasy film, directed by René Clair and starring Albert Préjean, Sandra Milovanoff and Paul Ollivier. It was based on a novel by Walter Schlee. The film's sets were designed by Robert Gys.

References

  1. Low p.406
  2. Workman, Christopher; Howarth, Troy (2016). "Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the Silent Era". Midnight Marquee Press. p. 211. ISBN   978-1936168-68-2.
  3. Workman, Christopher; Howarth, Troy (2016). "Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the Silent Era". Midnight Marquee Press. p. 214. ISBN   978-1936168-68-2.

Bibliography