Flame in the Heather

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Flame in the Heather
Directed by Donovan Pedelty
Written by
  • Donovan Pedelty
  • Esson Maule (novel)
Produced byVictor M. Greene
Starring
Cinematography Stanley Grant
Production
company
Crusade Films
Distributed by Paramount British Pictures
Release date
September 1935
Running time
66 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Flame in the Heather is a 1935 British historical drama film directed by Donovan Pedelty and starring Gwenllian Gill, Barry Clifton and Bruce Seton. It was made as a quota quickie at British and Dominions Elstree Studios. Much of the film was shot on location around Fort William. [1] It was fairly unusual as a low-budget quota film to be set in the past, as most films tended to have contemporary settings. [2]

Contents

Plot

During the Jacobite Rebellion,[ clarification needed ] an English spy infiltrates the Clan Cameron, but falls in love with the chief's daughter.

Cast

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References

  1. p.46-47
  2. Chibnall p.103

Bibliography