Gumdag

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Gumdag
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Gumdag
Location in Turkmenistan
Coordinates: 39°12′22″N54°35′26″E / 39.20611°N 54.59056°E / 39.20611; 54.59056 Coordinates: 39°12′22″N54°35′26″E / 39.20611°N 54.59056°E / 39.20611; 54.59056
Country Flag of Turkmenistan.svg  Turkmenistan
Province Balkan Region
Population
 (2021)
  Total33,000 (estimated)

Gumdag (formerly Kum Dag) is a city located in the Balkan province of Turkmenistan. It is located 43 km southeast of the city of Balkanabat. The city is home to the Gumdag oil and gas field.

Contents

History

Before Gumdag was established as a village, it was called Khuday-Dag, Bahangosha and Moncuklu. [1] Gumdag was founded as a village in the 1930s by nomadic families from nearby settlements. In the same years, a drilling machine was installed by the government in the sand hill 3 km west of the village. With the emergence of oil from the region, people from Balkanabat and other cities started to flock here. From 1951 to 1956, it remained attached to the Ashgabat region.

Population

1959 - 9237 [2]

1970 - 11615 [3]

1979 - 14449 [4]

1989 - 16529 [5]

2009 - 26831

2021 - 33000 (estimated)

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References

  1. Ataniyazov, Soltansha (1980). Туркменистанын Географик Атларынын Душундиришли Созлуги. Ashgabat: TSSR Academy of Sciences.
  2. Перепись населения СССР (1959)
  3. Перепись населения СССР (1970)
  4. Перепись населения СССР (1979)
  5. Перепись населения СССР (1989)