HMS Thunder

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Ten ships of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Thunder, while an eleventh was planned but never built:

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Also

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Citations

  1. Lloyd's Register (1783), seq. no. H84.
  2. Demerliac (1996), p. 130, #1084.
  3. Naval Chronicle, Vol. 4, pp. 513–14.
  4. Drinkwater (1905), p. 246.

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