Handle with Care (1935 film)

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Handle with Care
Directed by Randall Faye
Produced by Randall Faye
George King
Written by Randall Faye
Starring Molly Lamont
Jack Hobbs
James Finlayson
Cinematography Geoffrey Faithfull
Production
company
Embassy Films
Distributed by RKO
Release date
2 September 1935
Running time
59 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

Handle with Care is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Randall Faye and starring Molly Lamont, Jack Hobbs and James Finlayson. It was a quota quickie made at the Nettlefold Studios in Walton-on-Thames. [1]

Comedy is a genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humour. These films are designed to make the audience laugh through amusement and most often work by exaggerating characteristics for humorous effect. Films in this style traditionally have a happy ending. One of the oldest genres in film, some of the very first silent movies were comedies, as slapstick comedy often relies on visual depictions, without requiring sound. When sound films became more prevalent during the 1920s, comedy films took another swing, as laughter could result from burlesque situations but also dialogue.

Randall Faye was an American screenwriter, film producer, and director. He wrote for 64 films between 1926 and 1947. He died in Orange County, California.

Molly Lamont actress

Molly Lamont was a British film actress.

Contents

Cast

Jack Hobbs (actor) British actor

Jack Hobbs was a British stage and film actor who appeared in more than forty films. After making his debut in the 1915 silent The Yoke Hobbs appeared in a mixture of leading and supporting roles in both the silent and sound eras. He played the hero in several quota quickies of the 1930s, including All That Glitters (1936). He was cast as an effectively glib, smooth-talking antagonist in two George Formby films No Limit (1935) and It's in the Air (1938).

James Finlayson (actor) actor

James Finlayson was a Scottish-born American actor who worked in both silent and sound comedies. Bald, with a fake moustache, Finlayson had many trademark comic mannerisms and is known for his squinting, outraged, "double take and fade away" head reaction, and characteristic expression "d'ooooooh", and as the best remembered comic foil of Laurel and Hardy.

Henry Victor was an English-born character actor who had his highest profile in the film silent era, he appeared in numerous film roles in his native Britain, before emigrating to the US in 1939 where he continued his career.

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References

  1. Wood p.86

Bibliography