Hugh Orde

Last updated

Sir Hugh Orde
Sir Hugh Orde.jpg
Orde, speaking at the NHS Confederation Conference in 2012.
Born (1958-08-27) 27 August 1958 (age 61)
London, United Kingdom
Other namesHugh Stephen Roden Orde
Police career
CountryUnited Kingdom
Department Police Service of Northern Ireland
RankChief constable
Awards Order of the British Empire, Queen's Police Medal

Sir Hugh Stephen Roden Orde, OBE , QPM (born 27 August 1958) is a British police officer who was the President of the Association of Chief Police Officers, representing the 44 police forces of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Between 2002 and 2009, he was the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI).

Contents

Career

Sir Hugh joined London's Metropolitan Police Service in 1977. He rose quickly through the ranks, becoming Superintendent in the Territorial Support Group. Later, as Commander responsible for the service's Community Safety and Partnership section, Orde took part in the latter phase of the enquiry into the murder of Stephen Lawrence and its subsequent handling by the police.

Later Orde (by then a Deputy assistant commissioner) was assigned to the senior staff of the Stevens Report which investigated government collusion in sectarian killings in Northern Ireland. He was appointed as an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2001 and was knighted for his services to policing in 2005. In 2010 he was awarded a Queen's Police Medal.

Hugh Orde was appointed Chief Constable of the PSNI (which replaced the Royal Ulster Constabulary) on 29 May 2002, taking over from Acting Chief Constable Colin Cramphorn.

In April 2009, he announced he was stepping down as Chief Constable of Northern Ireland to become President of the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), assuming the position in the following autumn. [1]

In a 2010 speech at Oxford in which he discussed the threat of the dissident Irish republican campaign, Orde suggested that "To borrow a phrase from the past, we may be at an 'acceptable level of violence'—albeit at a far lower level than when the phrase was first coined" because dissident republicans were unlikely to respond to negotiation. Democratic Unionist Party MLA Jimmy Spratt called Orde's comments "outrageous" and an insult to those killed by dissident republicans. [2]

Sir Hugh is also the director of the Police National Assessment Centre.

He also holds a degree in Public Administration (BA) from the University of Kent.

He is a member (known as a 'graduate') of Common Purpose UK. He attended the Matrix course in West London 1994/95.

Police Roll of Honour Trust

In November 2013 Hugh Orde took up the role of Patron of the national police charity the Police Roll of Honour Trust. He joined Stephen House and Bernard Hogan-Howe as joint patrons. [3]

Honours

Knight-Bachelor.ribbon.png Order of the British Empire (Civil) Ribbon.png

Queens Police Medal for Merit.png Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal ribbon.png QEII Diamond Jubilee Medal ribbon.png Police Long Service and Good Conduct ribbon.png

RibbonDescriptionNotes
Knight-Bachelor.ribbon.png Knight Bachelor (Kt)
  • 2005
Order of the British Empire (Civil) Ribbon.png Order of the British Empire (OBE)
  • 2001
  • Officer
  • Civil Division
Queens Police Medal for Merit.png Queen's Police Medal (QPM)
  • 2010
Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal ribbon.png Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal
  • 2002
  • UK Version of this Medal
QEII Diamond Jubilee Medal ribbon.png Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal
  • 2012
  • UK Version of this Medal
Police Long Service and Good Conduct ribbon.png Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

Related Research Articles

Royal Ulster Constabulary former police force in Northern Ireland

The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. It was founded on 1 June 1922 as a successor to the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC). At its peak the force had around 8,500 officers with a further 4,500 who were members of the RUC Reserve. During the Troubles, 319 members of the RUC were killed and almost 9,000 injured in paramilitary assassinations or attacks, mostly by the Provisional IRA, which made the RUC, by 1983, the most dangerous police force in the world in which to serve. In the same period, the RUC killed 55 people, 28 of whom were civilians.

Police Service of Northern Ireland police service for Northen Ireland

The Police Service of Northern Ireland is the police force that serves Northern Ireland. It is the successor to the Royal Ulster Constabulary after it was reformed and renamed in 2001 on the recommendation of the Patten Report.

The Northern Ireland Policing Board is the police authority for Northern Ireland, charged with supervising the activities of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). It is a non-departmental public body composed of members of the Northern Ireland Assembly and independent citizens who are appointed by the Minister of Justice using the Nolan principles for public appointments.

The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), officially The Association of Chief Police Officers of England, Wales and Northern Ireland, was a not-for-profit private limited company that for many years led the development of policing practices in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Established in 1948, ACPO provided a forum for chief police officers to share ideas and coordinate their strategic operational responses, and advised government in matters such as terrorist attacks and civil emergencies. ACPO coordinated national police operations, major investigations, cross-border policing, and joint law enforcement. ACPO designated Senior Investigative Officers for major investigations and appointed officers to head ACPO units specialising in various areas of policing and crime reduction.

Sir Ronald Flanagan is a retired senior British police officer. He was the Home Office Chief Inspector of Constabulary for the United Kingdom excluding Scotland. Sir Ronnie was previously the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland since its creation in 2001 to 2002, and had been Chief Constable of its predecessor, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) until 2001.

Brigadier James Gordon Kerr, OBE, QGM, is a senior British Army officer and former military attaché who was head of the controversial Force Research Unit in Northern Ireland.

Nuala Patricia O'Loan, Baroness O'Loan, DBE, known between 2007 and 2009 as Dame Nuala O'Loan, is a noted public figure in Northern Ireland. She was the first Police Ombudsman from 1999 to 2007. In July 2009, it was announced that she was to be appointed to the House of Lords. Consequently, she was elevated to the peerage in September 2009. In December 2010, National University of Ireland, Maynooth appointed her as Chairman of its Governing Authority. She is a columnist with The Irish Catholic.

Sir Stephen House is a Scottish senior police officer who is currently Deputy Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.

Ken Jones (police officer) police officer (20th century)

Sir Kenneth Lloyd "Ken" Jones QPM is a British former police officer. He was a Deputy Commissioner of Victoria Police in Australia, former President of Association of Chief Police Officers for England, Wales and Northern Ireland in the United Kingdom and Senior Investigator of Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) of Hong Kong. Sir Ken Jones is a former President of Association of Chief Police Officers and presently defence & security advisor at the British Embassy in Washington DC. He was awarded the Queen's Police Medal in 2000 and was knighted for services to policing in 2009.

Massereene Barracks shooting 2009 shooting in Northern Ireland

On 7 March 2009, two off-duty British soldiers of 38 Engineer Regiment were shot dead outside Massereene Barracks in Antrim town, Northern Ireland. Two other soldiers and two civilian delivery men were also shot and wounded during the attack. An Irish republican paramilitary group, the Real IRA, claimed responsibility.

James Gamble, QPM, is a retired Northern Irish police officer from Bangor in County Down, Northern Ireland. He is the former chief executive of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), a police unit affiliated to the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) in the United Kingdom. He resigned in October 2010 after the Home Secretary Theresa May's decision to merge CEOP with SOCA and other bodies into a new National Crime Agency. Mr Gamble wanted CEOP to remain independent.

Sir Matthew David Baggott, is a retired senior British police officer. He was Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland from 2009 to 2014.

Judith Kyle Gillespie, CBE is a retired senior police officer. She was the Deputy Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland between June 2009 and March 2014.

Ronan Kerr was a Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) officer killed by a booby-trap car bomb planted outside his home on the 2 April 2011 at Highfield Close, just off the Gortin Road, near Killyclogher on the northern outskirts of Omagh in County Tyrone. Responsibility for the attack was later claimed by a dissident republican group claiming to be made of former members of the Provisional IRA.

Sir George Ernest Craythorne Hamilton is a Northern Ireland police officer. Since 2014, he has served as the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland. He was previously the Assistant Chief Constable with responsibility for rural policing.

The 1929 New Year Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the United Kingdom and British Empire. They were announced on 26 February 1929. The announcement of the list was delayed two months by the health of the king, who fell ill with septicaemia in November 1928. There were no recipients of the Royal Victorian Order and only two recipients in the military division of the Order of the British Empire.

The 1936 New Year Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the United Kingdom and British Empire. They were announced on 31 December 1935.

Stephen Carroll was a Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) officer who was killed by the Continuity IRA on 9 March 2009 in Craigavon, County Armagh, Northern Ireland. Carroll's killing marked the first time a serving police officer had been killed since the Good Friday Agreement in 1998.

Drew Harris

Jeremy Andrew Harris, is the current Garda Commissioner of Ireland since September 2018. He previously served as Deputy Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) from 2014 to 2018.

Acceptable level of violence

"Acceptable level of violence" is a phrase that has been used in reference to the Northern Ireland conflict. It came from the historic admission by Home Secretary Reginald Maudling in a December 1971 press conference that the British government could not eliminate the Provisional Irish Republican Army's terrorist attacks but only reduce them to an "acceptable level". Maudling's remarks were widely considered a gaffe; critics maintained that any violence was unacceptable. Nevertheless, the concept influenced the British government's strategy in dealing with Northern Irish terrorism, and continues to be used in discussions of ongoing political violence in Northern Ireland.

References

  1. "Orde quits NI police for new role". BBC News. 16 April 2009.
  2. "MLA hits out at Orde comments". The News Letter . 12 March 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2019.
  3. "New Patrons" . Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  4. https://www.kent.ac.uk/congregations/honorary-grads/archive/pre-2008/2000-09.html
Police appointments
Preceded by
Colin Cramphorn (acting)
Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland
2002–2009
Succeeded by
Judith Gillespie (acting)