IPC (electronics)

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IPC – Association Connecting Electronics Industries
Small logo IPC Association 2014.png
Formation1957;62 years ago (1957)
TypeIndustry association
Headquarters Bannockburn, Illinois United States
Chairman
Joe O'Neil
President and CEO
John W. Mitchell
Website www.ipc.org
Formerly called
Institute for Printed Circuits, Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits

IPC, the Association Connecting Electronics Industries, is a trade association whose aim is to standardize the assembly and production requirements of electronic equipment and assemblies. It was founded in 1957 as the Institute for Printed Circuits. Its name was later changed to the Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits to highlight the expansion from bare boards to packaging and electronic assemblies. In 1999, the organization formally changed its name to IPC with the accompanying tagline, Association Connecting Electronics Industries. [1]

A trade association, also known as an industry trade group, business association, sector association or industry body, is an organization founded and funded by businesses that operate in a specific industry. An industry trade association participates in public relations activities such as advertising, education, political donations, lobbying and publishing, but its focus is collaboration between companies. Associations may offer other services, such as producing conferences, networking or charitable events or offering classes or educational materials. Many associations are non-profit organizations governed by bylaws and directed by officers who are also members.

Electronics physics, engineering, technology and applications that deal with the emission, flow and control of electrons in vacuum and matter

Electronics comprises the physics, engineering, technology and applications that deal with the emission, flow and control of electrons in vacuum and matter. The identification of the electron in 1897, along with the invention of the vacuum tube, which could amplify and rectify small electrical signals, inaugurated the field of electronics and the electron age.

Contents

IPC is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as a standards developing organization [2] and is known globally for its standards. It publishes the most widely used acceptability standards in the electronics industry.

American National Standards Institute non-profit organization in the United States that develops standards

The American National Standards Institute is a private non-profit organization that oversees the development of voluntary consensus standards for products, services, processes, systems, and personnel in the United States. The organization also coordinates U.S. standards with international standards so that American products can be used worldwide.

IPC is headquartered in Bannockburn, Illinois, United States and maintains additional offices in Washington, D.C.; Taos, New Mexico; Arlington County, Virginia, in the United States; Stockholm, Sweden; Brussels, Belgium; Moscow, Russia; Bangalore, India; and Shanghai, Shenzhen and Beijing, China.

Bannockburn, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Bannockburn is a village in West Deerfield and Vernon townships in Lake County, Illinois, United States. The population was 1,583 at the 2010 census. The village is generally considered part of the Chicago area's North Shore region. The Friedman house by Frank Lloyd Wright is located in Bannockburn.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first President of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Standards

IPC standards are used by the electronics manufacturing industry. IPC-A-610 [3] , Acceptability of Electronic Assemblies, is used worldwide by original equipment manufacturers and EMS companies. There are more than 3600 trainers worldwide who are certified to train and test on the standard. Standards are created by committees of industry volunteers. Task groups have been formed in China, the United States, and Denmark.

IPC Standard Tree IPC Standard Tree.jpg
IPC Standard Tree

Standards published by IPC include:

General documents
Design specifications
Material specifications
Performance and inspection documents
Flex assembly and materials standards

Market research and statistical data

IPC members are eligible to participate in IPC’s statistical programs, which provide free monthly or quarterly reports for specific industry and product markets. Statistical programs cover the electronics manufacturing services (EMS), printed circuit board (PCB), laminate, process consumables, solder and assembly equipment segments. [4]

Electronics manufacturing services (EMS) is a term used for companies that design, manufacture, test, distribute, and provide return/repair services for electronic components and assemblies for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). The concept is also referred to as electronics contract manufacturing (ECM).

Printed circuit board board to support and connect electronic components

A printed circuit board (PCB) mechanically supports and electrically connects electronic components or electrical components using conductive tracks, pads and other features etched from one or more sheet layers of copper laminated onto and/or between sheet layers of a non-conductive substrate. Components are generally soldered onto the PCB to both electrically connect and mechanically fasten them to it.

Comprehensive annual reports are distributed for the EMS and PCB segments, covering market size and sales growth, with breakdowns by product type and product mix as well as revenue trends from value-added services, trends in materials, financial metrics, and forecasts for total production in the Americas and the world.

Monthly market reports for the EMS and PCB segments provide recent data on market size, sales and order growth, book-to-bill ratios and near-term forecasts. [4]

Book-to-bill ratio

The book-to-bill ratio, also known as the BB ratio or BO/BI ratio, is the ratio of orders received to the amount billed for a specific period, usually one month or one quarter. It is widely used in the technology sector and especially in the semiconductor industry, where the semiconductor manufacturing equipment (SME) book-to-bill ratio is considered an important leading indicator of demand trends.

Notes

  1. "History of IPC's Name". IPC. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  2. "Standards Developing Organizations (SDOs)". ANSI. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  3. Radcliff, katy (2018-09-26). "IPC-A-610 Specialist Training Using EDGE 2.0". katy Radcliff. Retrieved 2018-10-13.
  4. 1 2 "Market Research from IPC". IPC. Retrieved 2014-10-16.

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Point-to-point construction is a non-automated method of construction of electronics circuits widely used before the use of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and automated assembly gradually became widespread following their introduction in the 1950s. Circuits using thermionic valves were relatively large, relatively simple, and used large sockets, all of which made the PCB less obviously advantageous than with later complex semiconductor circuits. Point-to-point construction is still used to construct prototype equipment with few or heavy electronic components.

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Gerber format file format

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Sanders Associates was a defense contractor in Nashua, New Hampshire, United States, from 1951 until it was sold in 1986. It is now part of BAE Systems Electronics & Integrated Solutions, a subsidiary of BAE Systems. It concentrated on developing and manufacturing electronic systems, notably aircraft self-protection systems, and tactical surveillance and intelligence systems. Other business areas included microwave, missile and space electronics; infrared imaging; and automated mission planning systems, with both military and commercial applications.

Conformal coating material is a thin polymeric film which conforms to the contours of a printed circuit board to protect the board's components. Typically applied at 25-250 μm(micrometers) thickness, it is applied to electronic circuitry to protect against moisture, dust, chemicals, and temperature extremes.

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