Irish Protestant Home Rule Association

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Irish Protestant Home Rule Association was founded in Belfast in the Castle Restaurant in Donegall Place on 21 May 1886 [1] to support Gladstones Home Rule bill for Ireland among members of the various Protestant faiths, following a defeat in the House of Commons.

Belfast City in the United Kingdom, capital of Northern Ireland

Belfast is a city in the United Kingdom, the capital city of Northern Ireland, standing on the banks of the River Lagan on the east coast of Ireland. It is the largest city in Northern Ireland and second-largest on the island of Ireland. It had a population of 333,871 as of 2015.

On June 23, 1886, the inaugural meeting of the Dublin branch of the Irish Protestant Home Rule Association held in the Central Hall, Westmoreland St., Dublin.

The Association was founded following a split in the Liberal Party in Ulster among those who supported home rule (Gladstonian Liberals) and the larger number who were Liberal Unionist who formed the Ulster Liberal Unionist Association [2]

The Liberal Unionist Party was a British political party that was formed in 1886 by a faction that broke away from the Liberal Party. Led by Lord Hartington and Joseph Chamberlain, the party formed a political alliance with the Conservative Party in opposition to Irish Home Rule. The two parties formed the ten-year-long coalition Unionist Government 1895–1905 but kept separate political funds and their own party organisations until a complete merger was agreed in May 1912.

Its membership and support came from Liberal Protestants and Trade Unionists. Sometimes the Association was referred to as the Irish Protestant Home Rule Union or Irish Protestant Home Rule League. One of the founders was Portadown Liberal Thomas Shillington, a losing candidate in the 1885 election in North Armagh. The trade unionist Alexander Bowman served as its secretary, other members included Prof. Charles Hubert Oldham who managed the southern branch of the IPHRA.

Thomas Shillington was an Irish factory owner and politician.

Alexander Bowman (Irish politician) Irish politician and trade unioinist

Alexander Bowman was an Irish politician and trade unionist.

The association held meetings around Ireland, which were addressed by Protestant members of civic society including clergy of the main Protestant denominations.

In 1892 the Association issued a letter indicating that it was Anti-Parnellite.

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References

  1. Irish Home Rule, 1867-1921 By Alan O'Day, Manchester University Press (1998).
  2. Irish Peasants: Violence & Political Unrest, 1780-1914 By Samuel Clark, James S. Donnelly, Manchester University Press (1983).