John F. Wall

Last updated
John Furman Wall
LGEN JFWall.jpeg
Born (1931-10-19) October 19, 1931 (age 90)
Boise, Idaho, U.S.
AllegianceFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Service/branch United States Army
Rank Lieutenant general
Commands heldStrategic Defense Command

John Furman Wall (born October 19, 1931) is a retired lieutenant general in the United States Army. He served as Commander of the United States Army Strategic Defense Command. [1] [2] [3]

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References

  1. http://www.thereaganfiles.com/19860701-nsc-132-sdi.pdf [ bare URL PDF ]
  2. "U.S. Nuclear Forces and Arms Control Policy: Hearings Before the Defense Policy Panel of the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, Ninety-ninth Congress, Second Session, May 20, June 4, and 5, 1986". 1987.
  3. Who's who in Frontiers of Science and Technology. 1985. ISBN   9780837957029.