Josh Senter

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Joshua Senter
Joshua Senter 2015.JPG
Joshua Senter (2015)
Born (1979-02-14) February 14, 1979 (age 40)
Plato, Missouri
Occupation Screenwriter
Nationality American
Notable works Desperate Housewives

Joshua Ray Senter (born 14 February 1979) is an American screenwriter best known for his work on the television series Desperate Housewives .

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Screenwriter writer who writes for TV, films, comics and games

A screenplay writer, scriptwriter or scenarist is a writer who practices the craft of screenwriting, writing screenplays on which mass media, such as films, television programs and video games, are based.

Desperate Housewives is an American mystery comedy-drama television series created by Marc Cherry and produced by ABC Studios and Cherry Productions. It originally aired for eight seasons on ABC from October 3, 2004 until May 13, 2012. Executive producer Cherry served as showrunner. Other executive producers since the fourth season included Bob Daily, George W. Perkins, John Pardee, Joey Murphy, David Grossman, and Larry Shaw.

Contents

Career

Senter was born in Plato, Missouri, and his first Hollywood ambition was to become a Disney animator. After he sent his portfolio of drawings to Disney at the age of seventeen, the company called to tell him they were impressed but were not currently hiring, and he should resubmit in another six months. During those six months, he decided to pursue film directing, his other passion, and sent a collection of homemade films to Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He was one of fifteen film students selected that year, and one of the only students to have not already graduated from college. [1]

Plato, Missouri Place

Plato is an incorporated village in northwestern Texas County, Missouri, United States. It is located approximately 20 miles northwest of Houston and 10 miles south of Fort Leonard Wood on Route 32. The population was 109 at the 2010 census.

Hollywood Neighborhood of Los Angeles in California, United States

Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California, notable as the home of the U.S. film industry, including several of its historic studios. Its name has come to be a shorthand reference for the industry and the people associated with it.

Pasadena, California City in California, United States

Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States, located 10 miles northeast of Downtown Los Angeles.

Senter redirected his pursuit of directing to writing, working on spec scripts, both feature length and for television, before being taken on as a client at Writer's and Artist Agency. Soon he landed his first job on the lesbian drama The L Word , for which he wrote one episode. [1] Within a year after leaving The L Word, Senter returned to television when he was hired as a staff writer on the ABC drama series Desperate Housewives . He has since written six episodes spanning across the series' first, second and third seasons, debuting with the episode "Goodbye for Now". He was hired as a staff writer, made a story editor in the show's second season and promoted to an executive story editor in the third season. He wrote many of Bree, Lynette and Mary Alice's storylines, for which he drew much inspiration from his own mother. [1] [2]

<i>The L Word</i> television series

The L Word is an American-Canadian co-production television drama series portraying the lives of a group of lesbians and their friends, connections, family, and lovers in the trendy Greater Los Angeles, California city of West Hollywood.

"Goodbye for Now" is the 22nd episode of the ABC television series, Desperate Housewives. The episode was the 22nd episode for the show's first season. The episode was written by Josh Senter and was directed by David Grossman. It originally aired on Sunday May 15, 2005, and marks the introduction of Betty Applewhite as a new housewife.

Story editor is a job title in motion picture and television production, also sometimes called "supervising producer". A story editor is a member of the screenwriting staff who edits stories for screenplays.

In 2006 Senter was nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for the episode "Don't Look at Me". [3] In 2014 Joshua helped write and produce a new series for ABC Family called Chasing Life. And in 2015 he began work as a writer and producer for the critically acclaimed MTV series Finding Carter.

Writers Guild of America Award award

The Writers Guild of America Awards for outstanding achievements in film, television, radio and video game writing, including both fiction and non-fiction categories, have been presented annually by the Writers Guild of America, East and Writers Guild of America, West since 1949. In 2004, the awards show was broadcast on television for the first time.

"Don't Look at Me" is the 42nd episode of the ABC television series, Desperate Housewives. It was the 19th episode of the show's second season. The episode was written by Josh Senter and directed by David Grossman. It originally aired on Sunday, April 16, 2006.

Joshua's debut novel Daisies, about the evolution of love in America over the last 70 years, was released by Diversion Books on July 22, 2014.

Personal life

Senter grew up on a 500-acre (2.0 km2) farm in Fort Leonard Wood near Plato, Missouri and was homeschooled with his four sisters by his mother Brenda. Before the age of thirteen, his parents' fundamental Christian beliefs did not allow him to watch or their family to own a television, so instead he spent his time alone drawing, painting, throwing pottery and sewing: "Being alone so much probably helped me become a better writer since it’s just you and the computer when you write," he says of his childhood. [1] He recalls in particular his first viewing of Jurassic Park , which he says inspired him to become a filmmaker. [2] He and his younger sister Hannah, now an Atlantic Theater Company member and actress, bought a video camera which they used to make homemade short films and music videos. [1]

Missouri State of the United States of America

Missouri is a state in the Midwestern United States. With over six million residents, it is the 18th-most populous state of the Union. The largest urban areas are St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, and Columbia; the capital is Jefferson City. The state is the 21st-most extensive in area. Missouri is bordered by eight states : Iowa to the north, Illinois, Kentucky, and Tennessee to the east, Arkansas to the south, and Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska to the west. In the South are the Ozarks, a forested highland, providing timber, minerals, and recreation. The Missouri River, after which the state is named, flows through the center of the state into the Mississippi River, which makes up Missouri's eastern border.

Homeschooling, also known as home education is the education of children at home or a variety of places other than school. Home education is usually conducted by a parent or tutor or online teacher. Many families use less formal ways of educating. "Homeschooling" is the term commonly used in North America, whereas "home education" is commonly used in the United Kingdom, Europe, and in many Commonwealth countries.

Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth. Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and savior of all people, whose coming as the Messiah was prophesied in the Old Testament and chronicled in the New Testament. It is the world's largest religion with over 2.4 billion followers.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Jarrett Medlin (May 2007). "Desperate Success". 417 Magazine. Retrieved 2008-03-04.
  2. 1 2 Sony Hocklander (May 21, 2005). "A glimpse behind TV's desperately enticing tales". World-Leader.com. Archived from the original on January 30, 2013. Retrieved 2008-03-04.
  3. Carl DiOrio (December 14, 2006). "HBO, NBC dominate WGA noms". The Hollywood Reporter . Archived from the original on January 25, 2013. Retrieved 2008-03-04.