List of storms named Delta

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The name Delta has been used for one subtropical cyclone and for two tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean:

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1972 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1972 Atlantic hurricane season was a significantly below average season, having only four fully tropical named storms – the fewest since 1930. It officially began on June 1, 1972, and lasted until November 30, 1972. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first storm, Subtropical Storm Alpha, developed on May 23 off the Southeast United States and struck Florida, causing minor damage and two fatalities. Although several other tropical depressions developed, only Tropical Depression Five is known to have affected land.

The name Alex has been used for a total of 11 tropical cyclones worldwide: Four in the Atlantic Ocean, four in the West Pacific Ocean and three in the South Indian Ocean.

The name Charley or Charlie was used for eight tropical cyclones and one subtropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

The name Frances has been used for eight tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean and for one in the Australian region.

The name Nicole has been used for three tropical cyclones and one subtropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

2005 Atlantic hurricane season Summary of the relevant tropical storms

The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in history, until the record was broken 15 years later. The season broke numerous records at the time, with 28 tropical or subtropical storms recorded. The United States National Hurricane Center named 27 storms, exhausting the annual pre-designated list and resulting in the usage of six Greek letter names, and also identified an additional unnamed storm during a post-season re-analysis. A record 15 storms attained hurricane status, with maximum sustained winds of at least 74 mph (119 km/h); of those, a record seven became major hurricanes, which are a Category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson scale. Four storms of this season became Category 5 hurricanes, the highest ranking on the scale.

The name Dolly has been used for nine tropical cyclones in the Northern Atlantic Ocean:

The name Gustav was used for five tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean:

The name Gabrielle has been used for six tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean; Gabrielle is one of the original names on the rotating six-year cycle of names used in the North Atlantic basin established in 1979.

The name Beryl has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

2007 Atlantic hurricane season hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season was a slightly above-average season, featuring many weak and short-lived storms. Despite the high activity of weak storms during 2007, it was the first season to feature more than one Category 5 landfalling hurricane, a feat that would not be matched until ten years later. It produced 17 tropical cyclones, 15 tropical storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean, although as shown by Subtropical Storm Andrea and Tropical Storm Olga in early May and early December, respectively, the formation of tropical cyclones is possible at any time of the year. The first system, Subtropical Storm Andrea, developed on May 9, while the last storm, Tropical Storm Olga, dissipated on December 13. The most intense hurricane, Dean, is tied for the eighth most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded as well as the fourth most intense Atlantic hurricane at landfall. The season was one of only seven on record for the Atlantic with more than one Category 5 hurricane. It was the second on record in which an Atlantic hurricane, Felix, and an eastern Pacific hurricane, Henriette, made landfall on the same day. September had a then record-tying eight storms, until it was surpassed in 2020. However, the strengths and durations of most of the storms were low.

Atlantic hurricane season Tropical cyclone season

The Atlantic hurricane season is the period in a year from June through November when hurricanes usually form in the Atlantic Ocean. Tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic are called hurricanes, tropical storms, or tropical depressions. In addition, there have been several storms over the years that have not been fully tropical and are categorized as subtropical depressions and subtropical storms. Even though subtropical storms and subtropical depressions are not technically as strong as tropical cyclones, the damages can still be devastating.

Atlantic hurricane Tropical cyclone that forms in the Atlantic Ocean

An Atlantic hurricane or tropical storm is a tropical cyclone that forms in the Atlantic Ocean, primarily between the months of June and November. A hurricane differs from a cyclone or typhoon only on the basis of location. A hurricane is a storm that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and a cyclone occurs in the South Pacific Ocean or Indian Ocean.

Timeline of the 1982 Atlantic hurricane season Timeline of a tropical cyclone season

The 1982 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual tropical cyclone season in the north Atlantic Ocean. It was an inactive Atlantic hurricane season, during which only five tropical cyclones formed. The season officially began on June 1, 1982 and ended November 30, 1982. These dates, adopted by convention, historically describe the period in each year when most systems form. this year, however, most tropical activity was constrained to the month of September.

Timeline of the 1972 Atlantic hurricane season Timeline of a tropical cyclone season

The 1972 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual tropical cyclone season in the north Atlantic Ocean. It was a significantly below average season, having only four fully tropical named storms, the fewest since 1930. It was one of only five Atlantic hurricane seasons since 1944 to have no major hurricanes, the others being 1968, 1986, 1994, and 2013. The season officially began on June 1, 1972 and ended on November 30, 1972. These dates, adopted by convention, historically describe the period in each year when most tropical systems form. However, storm formation is possible at any time of the year, as demonstrated in 1972 by the formation of Subtropical Storm Alpha on May 23. The season's final storm, Subtropical Storm Delta, dissipated on November 7.

Hybrid low may refer to a number of different meteorological depressions:

2019 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season was the fourth consecutive above-average and damaging season dating back to 2016. It is tied with 1969 as the fifth-most active Atlantic hurricane season on record in terms of named storms, with 18 named storms and 20 tropical cyclones in total. However, many were weak and short-lived, especially towards the end of the season. Six of those named storms achieved hurricane status, while three intensified into major hurricanes. Two storms became Category 5 hurricanes, marking the fourth consecutive season with at least one Category 5 hurricane, the third consecutive season to feature at least one storm making landfall at Category 5 intensity, and the seventh on record to have multiple tropical cyclones reaching Category 5 strength. The season officially began on June 1 and ended on November 30. These dates historically describe the period each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin and are adopted by convention. However, tropical cyclogenesis is possible at any time of the year, as demonstrated by the formation of Subtropical Storm Andrea on May 20, marking the record fifth consecutive year where a tropical or subtropical cyclone developed before the official start of the season.

2020 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active and the fifth costliest Atlantic hurricane season on record. The season also had the highest accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) since 2017. In addition, it was the fifth consecutive above-average season from 2016 onward. The season featured a total of 31 tropical or subtropical cyclones, all but one of which became a named storm. Of the 30 named storms, 14 developed into hurricanes, and a record-tying seven further intensified into major hurricanes. It was the second and final season to use the Greek letter storm naming system, the first being 2005. Of the 30 named storms, 11 of them made landfall in the contiguous United States, breaking the record of nine set in 1916. During the season, 27 tropical storms established a new record for earliest formation date by storm number. This season also featured a record 10 tropical cyclones that underwent rapid intensification, tying it with 1995. This unprecedented activity was fueled by a La Niña that developed in the summer months of 2020. Despite the extreme activity, this was the first season since 2015 in which no Category 5 hurricane formed.

Tropical cyclones in 2020 Tropical cyclone year

During 2020, tropical cyclones formed within seven different tropical cyclone basins, located within various parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. During the year, 141 tropical cyclones formed in bodies of water known as tropical cyclone basins. Of these, 104, including three subtropical cyclones in the South Atlantic Ocean and three tropical-like cyclones in the Mediterranean, were named by various weather agencies when they attained maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. The strongest storm of the year was Yasa, peaking with a pressure of 899 hPa (26.55 inHg) and with 10-minute sustained winds of 250 km/h (155 mph). The deadliest storm of the year was Eta which caused 175 fatalities and another 100+ to be missing in Central America and the US, while the costliest storm of the year was Laura, with a damage cost around $19.1 billion in the Greater Antilles, The Bahamas, and the Gulf Coast of the United States.

Tropical cyclones in 2021 Tropical cyclone year

In 2021, tropical cyclones have formed in six major bodies of water, commonly known as tropical cyclone basins. Tropical cyclones will be assigned names by various weather agencies if they attain maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. During this year, 97 systems have formed and 59 were named, including one subtropical depression and excluding one system which was unofficial. So far, the most intense storm of the year was Typhoon Surigae, with maximum 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 220 km/h (140 mph) and a minimum pressure of 895 hPa (26.43 inHg). The deadliest tropical cyclone so far was Cyclone Seroja, which caused 272 fatalities in total, while the costliest was Hurricane Ida, which caused an estimated $15 billion USD in damage as of August 2021.