Marco Arati

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Marco Arati (181? - 1899) was an Italian operatic bass active during the 1840s through the 1880s. Although he occasionally appeared at other opera houses in Italy, he was primarily committed to the Teatro di San Carlo where he sang roles for more than four decades. Even though he was one of the preeminent singers of his day, there is little known about his life.

Opera artform combining sung text and musical score in a theatrical setting

Opera is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theater. Such a "work" is typically a collaboration between a composer and a librettist and incorporates a number of the performing arts, such as acting, scenery, costume, and sometimes dance or ballet. The performance is typically given in an opera house, accompanied by an orchestra or smaller musical ensemble, which since the early 19th century has been led by a conductor.

A bass ( BAYSS) is a type of classical male singing voice and has the lowest vocal range of all voice types. According to The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, a bass is typically classified as having a vocal range extending from around the second E below middle C to the E above middle C (i.e., E2–E4). Its tessitura, or comfortable range, is normally defined by the outermost lines of the bass clef. Categories of bass voices vary according to national style and classification system. Italians favour subdividing basses into the basso cantante (singing bass), basso buffo ("funny" bass), or the dramatic basso profondo (low bass). The American system identifies the bass-baritone, comic bass, lyric bass, and dramatic bass. The German fach system offers further distinctions: Spielbass (Bassbuffo), Schwerer Spielbass (Schwerer Bassbuffo), Charakterbass (Bassbariton), and Seriöser Bass. These classification systems can overlap. Rare is the performer who embodies a single fach without also touching repertoire from another category.

Opera house theatre building used for opera performances

An opera house is a theatre building used for opera performances that consists of a stage, an orchestra pit, audience seating, and backstage facilities for costumes and set building.

Contents

Biography

The exact place and date of Arati's birth is unknown, although it is likely that he was born somewhere between 1814-1819. He made his professional opera debut at the Teatro di San Carlo in 1841 in a production of Teodulo Mabellini's Rolla . He sang in numerous world premieres at the Teatro di San Carlo during his career, most notably the roles of Andrea Cornaro in Gaetano Donizetti's Caterina Cornaro (1844), Alvaro in Giuseppe Verdi's Alzira (1845), Old Orazio in Saverio Mercadante's Orazi e Curiazi (1846), Callistene in Donizetti's Poliuto (1848), Wurm in Verdi's Luisa Miller (1849), Marco in Mercadante's Virginia (1866), and Filippo Augusto in Donizetti's Gabriella di Vergy (1869). His last known opera appearance was at the Teatro di San Carlo in 1882 as Indra in Jules Massenet's Le roi de Lahore . He died in 1899. [1]

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References

  1. The Musical Courier, January 17, 1900, No. 1034, p.22.