Miles v European Schools

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Miles v European Schools
Court European Court of Justice
Citation(s)(2011) C-196/09
Keywords
Preliminary ruling

Miles v European Schools (2011) C-196/09 is an EU law case, concerning preliminary references to the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Contents

Facts

The Complaints Board of European Schools (set up under an international agreement between different member states and the EU, the European Schools Convention) sought to make a preliminary reference to the Court of Justice, and the question was whether it could do so under TFEU article 267.

Judgment

The Court of Justice, Grand Chamber held that the Complaints Board of European Schools was a court, but not of a member state. This was different from the Benelux Court.

See also

Notes

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