Natural topology

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The 2-sphere is usually considered as a subspace of 3-dimensional Euclidean space, so its natural topology is inherited from the Euclidean topology. Sphere wireframe 10deg 6r.svg
The 2-sphere is usually considered as a subspace of 3-dimensional Euclidean space, so its natural topology is inherited from the Euclidean topology.

In any domain of mathematics, a space has a natural topology if there is a topology on the space which is "best adapted" to its study within the domain in question. In many cases this imprecise definition means little more than the assertion that the topology in question arises naturally or canonically (see mathematical jargon) in the given context.

Mathematics Field of study concerning quantity, patterns and change

Mathematics includes the study of such topics as quantity, structure, space, and change.

Topology Branch of mathematics

In mathematics, topology is concerned with the properties of space that are preserved under continuous deformations, such as stretching, twisting, crumpling and bending, but not tearing or gluing.

Note that in some cases multiple topologies seem "natural". For example, if Y is a subset of a totally ordered set X, then the induced order topology, i.e. the order topology of the totally ordered Y, where this order is inherited from X, is coarser than the subspace topology of the order topology of X.

In mathematics, a linear order, total order, simple order, or (non-strict) ordering is a binary relation on some set , which is antisymmetric, transitive, and a connex relation. A set paired with a total order is called a totally ordered set, a linearly ordered set, a simply ordered set, or a chain.

In mathematics, an order topology is a certain topology that can be defined on any totally ordered set. It is a natural generalization of the topology of the real numbers to arbitrary totally ordered sets.

In topology and related areas of mathematics, a subspace of a topological space X is a subset S of X which is equipped with a topology induced from that of X called the subspace topology.

"Natural topology" does quite often have a more specific meaning, at least given some prior contextual information: the natural topology is a topology which makes a natural map or collection of maps continuous. This is still imprecise, even once one has specified what the natural maps are, because there may be many topologies with the required property. However, there is often a finest or coarsest topology which makes the given maps continuous, in which case these are obvious candidates for the natural topology.

The simplest cases (which nevertheless cover many examples) are the initial topology and the final topology (Willard (1970)). The initial topology is the coarsest topology on a space X which makes a given collection of maps from X to topological spaces Xi continuous. The final topology is the finest topology on a space X which makes a given collection of maps from topological spaces Xi to X continuous.

In general topology and related areas of mathematics, the initial topology on a set , with respect to a family of functions on , is the coarsest topology on X that makes those functions continuous.

In general topology and related areas of mathematics, the final topology on a set , with respect to a family of functions into , is the finest topology on X which makes those functions continuous.

Two of the simplest examples are the natural topologies of subspaces and quotient spaces.

In mathematics, a set A is a subset of a set B, or equivalently B is a superset of A, if A is "contained" inside B, that is, all elements of A are also elements of B. A and B may coincide. The relationship of one set being a subset of another is called inclusion or sometimes containment. A is a subset of B may also be expressed as B includes A; or A is included in B.

Inclusion map

In mathematics, if A is a subset of B, then the inclusion map is the function ι that sends each element, x, of A to x, treated as an element of B:

Quotient space (topology) topological space consisting of equivalence classes of points in another topological space

In topology and related areas of mathematics, a quotient space is, intuitively speaking, the result of identifying or "gluing together" certain points of a given topological space. The points to be identified are specified by an equivalence relation. This is commonly done in order to construct new spaces from given ones. The quotient topology consists of all sets with an open preimage under the canonical projection map that maps each element to its equivalence class.

Another example is that any metric space has a natural topology induced by its metric.

Related Research Articles

In topology and related branches of mathematics, a Hausdorff space, separated space or T2 space is a topological space where for any two distinct points there exists a neighbourhood of each which is disjoint from the neighbourhood of the other. Of the many separation axioms that can be imposed on a topological space, the "Hausdorff condition" (T2) is the most frequently used and discussed. It implies the uniqueness of limits of sequences, nets, and filters.

Normed vector space vector space on which a norm is defined

In mathematics, a normed vector space is a vector space over the real or complex numbers, on which a norm is defined. A norm is the formalization and the generalization to real vector spaces of the intuitive notion of distance in the real world. A norm is a real-valued function defined on the vector space that has the following properties:

  1. The zero vector, 0, has zero length; every other vector has a positive length.
  2. Multiplying a vector by a positive number changes its length without changing its direction. Moreover,
  3. The triangle inequality holds. That is, taking norms as distances, the distance from point A through B to C is never shorter than going directly from A to C, or the shortest distance between any two points is a straight line.

In topology and related areas of mathematics, a product space is the Cartesian product of a family of topological spaces equipped with a natural topology called the product topology. This topology differs from another, perhaps more obvious, topology called the box topology, which can also be given to a product space and which agrees with the product topology when the product is over only finitely many spaces. However, the product topology is "correct" in that it makes the product space a categorical product of its factors, whereas the box topology is too fine; this is the sense in which the product topology is "natural".

In mathematics, a topological space is called separable if it contains a countable, dense subset; that is, there exists a sequence of elements of the space such that every nonempty open subset of the space contains at least one element of the sequence.

In topology and related branches of mathematics, a topological space may be defined as a set of points, along with a set of neighbourhoods for each point, satisfying a set of axioms relating points and neighbourhoods. The definition of a topological space relies only upon set theory and is the most general notion of a mathematical space that allows for the definition of concepts such as continuity, connectedness, and convergence. Other spaces, such as manifolds and metric spaces, are specializations of topological spaces with extra structures or constraints. Being so general, topological spaces are a central unifying notion and appear in virtually every branch of modern mathematics. The branch of mathematics that studies topological spaces in their own right is called point-set topology or general topology.

In topology and related branches of mathematics, Tychonoff spaces and completely regular spaces are kinds of topological spaces. These conditions are examples of separation axioms.

This is a glossary of some terms used in the branch of mathematics known as topology. Although there is no absolute distinction between different areas of topology, the focus here is on general topology. The following definitions are also fundamental to algebraic topology, differential topology and geometric topology.

Topological group Group that is a topological space with continuous group action

In mathematics, a topological group is a group G together with a topology on G such that the group's binary operation and the group's inverse function are continuous functions with respect to the topology. A topological group is a mathematical object with both an algebraic structure and a topological structure. Thus, one may perform algebraic operations, because of the group structure, and one may talk about continuous functions, because of the topology.

In mathematics, a topological vector space is one of the basic structures investigated in functional analysis. A topological vector space is a vector space which is also a topological space, thereby admitting a notion of continuity. More specifically, its topological space has a uniform topological structure, allowing a notion of uniform convergence.

In topology, a discrete space is a particularly simple example of a topological space or similar structure, one in which the points form a discontinuous sequence, meaning they are isolated from each other in a certain sense. The discrete topology is the finest topology that can be given on a set, i.e., it defines all subsets as open sets. In particular, each singleton is an open set in the discrete topology.

General topology

In mathematics, general topology is the branch of topology that deals with the basic set-theoretic definitions and constructions used in topology. It is the foundation of most other branches of topology, including differential topology, geometric topology, and algebraic topology. Another name for general topology is point-set topology.

In topology and related branches of mathematics, a totally disconnected space is a topological space that is maximally disconnected, in the sense that it has no non-trivial connected subsets. In every topological space the empty set and the one-point sets are connected; in a totally disconnected space these are the only connected subsets.

In topology, an Alexandrov topology is a topology in which the intersection of any family of open sets is open. It is an axiom of topology that the intersection of any finite family of open sets is open; in Alexandrov topologies the finite restriction is dropped.

In general topology and related areas of mathematics, the disjoint union of a family of topological spaces is a space formed by equipping the disjoint union of the underlying sets with a natural topology called the disjoint union topology. Roughly speaking, two or more spaces may be considered together, each looking as it would alone.

In mathematics, a topological space X is uniformizable if there exists a uniform structure on X which induces the topology of X. Equivalently, X is uniformizable if and only if it is homeomorphic to a uniform space.

In topology and related areas of mathematics, an induced topology on a topological space is a topology which makes the inducing function continuous from/to this topological space.

In topology, a coherent topology is a topology that is uniquely determined by a family of subspaces. Loosely speaking, a topological space is coherent with a family of subspaces if it is a topological union of those subspaces. It is also sometimes called the weak topology generated by the family of subspaces, a notion which is quite different from the notion of a weak topology generated by a set of maps.

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