Night Birds (film)

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Night Birds
Directed by Richard Eichberg
Written by
Produced byRichard Eichberg
Starring
Cinematography
Music by John Reynders
Production
companies
Distributed by Wardour Films (UK)
Release date
16 October 1930
Running time
97 minutes
Countries
  • Weimar Republic
  • United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Night Birds is a 1930 British-German thriller film directed by Richard Eichberg and starring Jack Raine, Muriel Angelus and Jameson Thomas. [1] A separate German language version, The Copper , was made at the same time.

Contents

Cast

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References

  1. "BFI Database entry". Archived from the original on 21 October 2012. Retrieved 4 September 2010.