Red God

Last updated
Red God
Sire Nasrullah
Grandsire Nearco
DamSpring Run
Damsire Menow
Sex Stallion
Foaled1954
CountryUnited States
Colour Chestnut
Breeder Harry F. Guggenheim
OwnerHarry F. Guggenheim
Trainer Cecil Boyd-Rochfort (England)
Record14: 5-2-0
Earnings$37,389 & £3,062
Major wins
Richmond Stakes (1956)
Roseben Handicap (1958)

Red God (1954–1979) was a Thoroughbred race horse foaled in Kentucky who competed in England and the United States but who is best known as the sire of Blushing Groom who prominent turfman Edward L. Bowen calls one of the great international sires of the 20th century.

Contents

Racing career

At age two, Red God won the Richmond Stakes at Goodwood Racecourse and was second in the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster Racecourse after which he was brought back to the United States with plans to enter him in the American Triple Crown series. He won his American debut but was injured and out of racing for the rest of 1957. He returned to the track in 1958, with his best result a win in the Roseben Handicap at Belmont Park.

Stud record

Retired from racing, in 1960 Red God was sent to stand at Loughton Stud in County Kildare, Ireland. Here he sired 10 stakes winners for 13 stakes wins with over £1 million in earnings. [1]

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References

  1. Biggar, Allan, (ed.), The Stallion Review, 1977