Richard Digges

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Richard Digges (died 1634) was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1597 to 1629.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Digges was the son John Digges of Purton, Wiltshire and his wife Elizabeth Noddall, of Yorkshire. He was educated at Oxford University and was awarded BA on 27 May 1579. He studied law at New Inn and then at Lincoln's Inn in 1581 and was called to the bar in 1589. [1] In November 1590 Digges was employed as an Exchequer surveyor by Lord Burghley.

New Inn village and community in Torfaen County Borough in south east Wales

New Inn - - is a village and community of approximately 3,000 households directly south east of Pontypool, within the County Borough of Torfaen in Wales, within the historic boundaries of Monmouthshire.

Lincolns Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. Lincoln's Inn is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers.

In 1597, he was elected Member of Parliament for Marlborough and was re-elected in every election until 1628. He was of counsel to Marlborough before 1603 and became Mayor of Marlborough in 1608. He was a bencher of Lincoln's Inn and autumn reader in 1608 and in 1614 Keeper of the Black Book. He was treasurer from 1616 to 1617 and Lent reader in 1619. He became serjeant-at-law in 1623. [2]

Marlborough was a parliamentary borough in Wiltshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1295 until 1868, and then one member from 1868 until 1885, when the borough was abolished.

Serjeant-at-law Member of an order of barristers at the English bar

A Serjeant-at-Law (SL), commonly known simply as a Serjeant, was a member of an order of barristers at the English bar. The position of Serjeant-at-Law, or Sergeant-Counter, was centuries old; there are writs dating to 1300 which identify them as descended from figures in France before the Norman Conquest. The Serjeants were the oldest formally created order in England, having been brought into existence as a body by Henry II. The order rose during the 16th century as a small, elite group of lawyers who took much of the work in the central common law courts. With the creation of Queen's Counsel during the reign of Elizabeth I, the order gradually began to decline, with each monarch opting to create more King's or Queen's Counsel. The Serjeants' exclusive jurisdictions were ended during the 19th century and, with the Judicature Act 1873 coming into force in 1875, it was felt that there was no need to have such figures, and no more were created. The last Irish Serjeant-at-Law was Serjeant Sullivan. The last English Serjeant-at-Law was Lord Lindley.

Digges was buried at Marlborough on 26 January 1634. He had married firstly Margaret Gore, daughter of Richard Gore of Aldrington, Wiltshire and had a son and two daughters. He married secondly Elizabeth Waldron, daughter of Thomas Waldron. [2]

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Richard Wheler
Anthony Hungerford
Member of Parliament for Marlborough
1597–1629
With: Richard Wheler 1597
Lawrence Hyde 1601–1611
Sir Francis Popham 1614
William Seymour, Lord Beauchamp 1621
Walter Devereux 1621–1622
Sir Francis Seymour 1624
Edward Kyrton 1625–1626
Henry Piercy
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640