Sega Saturn Magazine

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Sega Saturn Magazine
Sega Saturn Magazine Issue 32.JPG
June 1998 issue
EditorSamantha Robinson, Richard Leadbetter
Categories Video games
FrequencyMonthly
First issueJanuary 1994 (as Sega Magazine)
Final issue
Number
November 1998
59
Company EMAP
Country United Kingdom
Based in London
Language English
ISSN 1360-9424

Sega Saturn Magazine was a monthly UK magazine covering the Sega Saturn, a home video game console. [1] It held the official Saturn magazine license for the UK, and as such some issues included a demo CD created by Sega, Sega Flash, which included playable games and game footage. [2] In 1997 the magazine claimed a readership of 30,140. [3] The last issue was Issue 37, November 1998. [4]

Sega Saturn Magazine was originally known as Sega Magazine [5] which launched in 1994 and covered the Sega consoles available at the time, including the Sega Master System, Sega Mega Drive, Sega Mega-CD, Sega 32X and Sega Game Gear. From November 1995 the magazine was relaunched as Sega Saturn Magazine [1] and coverage of other Sega consoles were gradually reduced and withdrawn in favour of the Sega Saturn.

In addition to reviews, previews, and demo discs, the magazine included interviews with developers about topics such as the development libraries that Sega was providing them with, and would routinely cover topics of interest only to hardcore gamers such as imported Japanese RPGs and beat 'em ups. The magazine retained its title even after its content became chiefly devoted to the Saturn's successor, the Dreamcast, as the Saturn had been discontinued in Europe.

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References

  1. 1 2 The Mean Machines Archive. "Contemporary Magazines - Official Sega Saturn Magazine" . Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  2. Segagaga Domain. "Sega Flash Vol:7 (セガ ファラシュー VOL:7)". Archived from the original on 2007-01-02. Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  3. "SSM Rules!" (PDF). Sega Saturn Magazine. No. 18. Emap International Limited. April 1997. p. 7. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  4. UK:Resistance. "News Archive Ten" . Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  5. The Mean Machines Archive. "History - Twilight Days" . Retrieved 2007-01-23.

(Wayback Machine copy)

(Wayback Machine copy)