Sega Saturn Magazine

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Sega Saturn Magazine
Sega Saturn Magazine Issue 32.JPG
The cover of Sega Saturn Magazine (June 1998)
EditorSamantha Robinson, Richard Leadbetter
Categories Video games
FrequencyMonthly
First issueJanuary 1994 (as Sega Magazine)
Final issue
Number
November 1998
37
Company EMAP
Country United Kingdom
Language English
ISSN 1360-9424

Sega Saturn Magazine was a monthly UK magazine dedicated to the Sega Saturn. [1] It held the official Saturn magazine license for the UK, and as such some issues included a demo CD created by Sega, called Sega Flash, which included playable games and game footage. [2] In 1997 they claimed a readership of 30,140. [3] The last issue was Issue 37, November 1998. [4]

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. The United Kingdom's 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi) were home to an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

A magazine is a publication, usually a periodical publication, which is printed or electronically published. This article concerns magazines printed on paper. Digital or online electronic magazines are covered in a different Wikipedia article. Magazines are generally published serially on a regular schedule and contain a variety of content. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by prepaid subscriptions, or a combination of the three.

Sega Saturn Video game console

The Sega Saturn is a 32-bit fifth-generation home video game console developed by Sega and released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America, and July 8, 1995 in Europe. The successor to the successful Sega Genesis, the Saturn has a dual-CPU architecture and eight processors. Its games are in CD-ROM format, and its game library contains several arcade ports as well as original games.

Sega Saturn Magazine was originally known as Sega Magazine [5] which launched in 1994 and covered the Sega consoles available at the time, including the Sega Master System, Sega Mega Drive, Sega Mega-CD, Sega 32X and Sega Game Gear. From November 1995 the magazine was relaunched as Sega Saturn Magazine [1] and coverage of other Sega consoles were gradually reduced and withdrawn in favour of the Sega Saturn.

In addition to reviews, previews, and demo discs, the magazine included interviews with developers about topics such as the development libraries that Sega was providing them with, and would routinely cover topics of interest only to hardcore gamers such as imported Japanese RPGs and beat 'em ups. The magazine retained its title even after its content became chiefly devoted to the Saturn's successor, the Dreamcast, as the Saturn had been discontinued in Europe.

Beat 'em up is a video game genre featuring hand-to-hand combat between the protagonist and an improbably large number of opponents. Traditional beat 'em ups take place in scrolling, two-dimensional (2D) levels, though some later games feature more open three-dimensional (3D) environments with yet larger numbers of enemies. These games are noted for their simple gameplay, a source of both critical acclaim and derision. Two-player cooperative gameplay and multiple player characters are also hallmarks of the genre. Most of these games take place in urban settings and feature crime-fighting and revenge-based plots, though some games may employ historical, science fiction or fantasy themes.

Dreamcast video game console

The Dreamcast is a home video game console released by Sega on November 27, 1998 in Japan, September 9, 1999 in North America, and October 14, 1999 in Europe. It was the first in the sixth generation of video game consoles, preceding Sony's PlayStation 2, Nintendo's GameCube and Microsoft's Xbox. The Dreamcast was Sega's final home console, marking the end of the company's 18 years in the console market.

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References

  1. 1 2 The Mean Machines Archive. "Contemporary Magazines - Official Sega Saturn Magazine" . Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  2. Segagaga Domain. "Sega Flash Vol:7 (セガ ファラシュー VOL:7)". Archived from the original on 2007-01-02. Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  3. "SSM Rules!". Sega Saturn Magazine. No. 18. Emap International Limited. April 1997. p. 7.
  4. UK:Resistance. "News Archive Ten" . Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  5. The Mean Machines Archive. "History - Twilight Days" . Retrieved 2007-01-23.