Sharp sand

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Sharp sand, also known as grit sand or river sand and as builders' sand when medium or coarse grain, is a gritty sand used in concrete and potting soil mixes or to loosen clay soil [1] as well as for building projects. It is not cleaned or smoothed to the extent recreational play sand is. It is useful for drainage. [2] It is an angular grained sand. [3] It was used in the production of brass. [4] It is now used in the building trade. Sand and gravel ridges known as eskers are a frequently used source. [5]

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A number of factors affect the permeability of soils, from particle size, impurities in the water, void ratio, the degree of saturation, and adsorbed water, to entrapped air and organic material.

References

  1. "Definition of sharp sand". davesgarden.com.
  2. livingearth.net Sharp Sand | Living Earth Texas
  3. "Definition of SHARP SAND". www.merriam-webster.com.
  4. "London Encyclopaedia; Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art, Literature and Practical Mechanics: Comprising a Popular View of the Present State of Knowledge". Thomas Tegg. November 16, 1829 via Google Books.
  5. Lyle, Paul (October 27, 2010). Between rocks and hard places: discovering Ireland's northern landscapes. Macmillan. ISBN   9780337095870 via Google Books.