Sharston Hall

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Sharston Hall was a manor house built in Sharston, an area of Wythenshawe, Manchester, England, in 1701. [1] A three-storey building with Victorian additions, [2] it was purchased by Thomas Worthington, an early umbrella tycoon, and occupied by the Worthington family until 1856, when the last male heir died. [1] The hall was occupied by the Henriques family in the 1920s, but following their death in a motor accident in 1932 the house was converted into flats. [3] [lower-alpha 1] Manchester Corporation purchased the hall in 1926. [5] During the Second World War it was leased by the local watch committee for use by the police, civil defence and fire services. [6]

Manor house country house that historically formed the administrative centre of a manor

A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry.

Sharston Area of Manchester, England, United Kingdom

Sharston is an area of Wythenshawe, south Manchester, England. The population at the 2011 census was 16,754.

Wythenshawe area of south Manchester, England

Wythenshawe is an area of south Manchester, England.

Contents

From 1941 until 1957 Sharston Hall's coach house served as Wythenshawe's fire station. [7] In 1948 the Sharston Community Association, founded that same year, was allocated part of the hall for use as a community centre. Two years later the association took over the entire house, expanding in 1957 to also occupy the coach house then recently vacated by the fire service. [8]

By the late 1960s the hall was in a poor state of repair and was boarded up. [6] Sharston Hall was demolished in 1986, replaced by offices in a sympathetic 18th-century style [2]  – or what Pevsner's architectural guide calls a parody of it [9]  – and houses. [2]

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References

Notes

  1. David Q. Henriques was a Manchester stockbroker and magistrate. He apparently lost control of the car he was driving in Hazel Grove and was involved in a head-on collision with a tram travelling in the opposite direction. Both Henriques and his wife died on their way to Stockport Infirmary. [4]

Citations

  1. 1 2 "Halls Farms & Cottages", Wythenshawe History Group, retrieved 21 November 2017
  2. 1 2 3 Deakin (1989), p. 11.
  3. Deakin (1983), p. 37.
  4. "Man and Wife Killed: Motor's Terrible Crash with Tram" . Hull Daily Mail. 20 June 1932. p. 6 via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. Cooper (2007), p. 158.
  6. 1 2 Deakin (1989), p. 115.
  7. Deakin (1989), p. 121.
  8. Deakin (1989), p. 132.
  9. Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 505.

Bibliography

  • Cooper, Glynis (2007), The Illustrated History of Manchester's Suburbs, Breedon Books, ISBN   978-1-85983-592-0
  • Deakin, Derick (1983), Looking Back at Northenden, Willow Publishing, ISBN   978-0-946361-03-8
  • Deakin, Derick (1989), Wythenshawe: The Story of a Garden City, Phillimore & Co., ISBN   978-0-85033-699-3
  • Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004), Lancashire:Manchester and the South-East, The Buildings of England, Yale University Press, ISBN   978-0-300-10583-4
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