Shuttlecock

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Feather shuttlecock Shuttlecocks Yonex Aerosensa 20.jpg
Feather shuttlecock
Plastic shuttlecock ShuttlecockPhoto.jpg
Plastic shuttlecock

A shuttlecock (also called a birdie or shuttle) is a high-drag projectile used in the sport of badminton. It has an open conical shape formed by feathers or plastic (or a synthetic alternative) embedded into a rounded cork (or rubber) base. The shuttlecock's shape makes it extremely aerodynamically stable. Regardless of initial orientation, it will turn to fly cork first, and remain in the cork-first orientation.

Contents

Origins

The object resembles a hawk's lure, used from ancient times in the training of hunting birds.[ citation needed ] It is frequently shortened to shuttle. The "shuttle" part of the name is derived from its back-and-forth motion during the game, resembling the shuttle of a 14th-century loom, while the "cock" part of the name is derived from the resemblance of the feathers to those on a rooster. [1] [ failed verification ]

Specifications

A regulation standard shuttlecock weighs around 4.75 to 5.50  g (0.168 to 0.194  oz ). It has 16 feathers with each feather 62 to 70  mm (2.4 to 2.8  in ) in length, and the diameter of the cork is 25 to 28 mm (0.98 to 1.10 in). [2] The diameter of the circle that the feathers make is around 58 to 68 mm (2.3 to 2.7 in). [3] [4]

Construction and materials

A shuttlecock is formed from 16 or so overlapping feathers, usually goose or duck, embedded into a rounded cork base. Feathers are plucked from the wings of a live goose or duck, a method which has been deemed cruel by animal rights activists in recent years. [5] The cork is covered with thin leather. [6] To ensure satisfactory flight properties, it is considered preferable to use feathers from right or left wings only in each shuttlecock, and not mix feathers from different wings, as the feathers from different wings are shaped differently. Badminton companies make shuttlecock corks by sandwiching polyurethane between corks and/or using a whole piece of natural cork. With the first method, the cork becomes misshaped after use, while the cork in the latter method changes very little after use. This is because the structure of the shuttlecock is more durable when made with a single piece of natural cork. [7] [8]

Feather or synthetic shuttlecocks

The feathers are brittle; shuttlecocks break easily and often need to be replaced several times during a game. For this reason, synthetic shuttlecocks have been developed that replace the feathers with a plastic skirt. Players often refer to synthetic shuttlecocks as plastics and feathered shuttlecocks as feathers'. Feather shuttles need to be properly humidified for at least 4 hours prior to play in order to fly the correct distance at the proper speed and to last longer. Properly humidified feathers flex during play, enhancing the shuttle's speed change and durability. Dry feathers are brittle and break easily, causing the shuttle to wobble. Saturated feathers are 'mushy', making the feather cone narrow too much when strongly hit, which causes the shuttle to fly overly far and fast. Typically a humidification box is used, or a small moist sponge is inserted in the feather end of the closed shuttle tube container, avoiding any water contact with the cork of the shuttle. Shuttles are tested prior to play to make sure they fly true and at the proper speed, and cover the proper distance. Different weights of shuttles are used to compensate for local atmospheric conditions. Both humidity and height above sea level affect shuttle flight. World Badminton Federation Rules say the shuttle should reach the far doubles service line plus or minus half the width of the tram. According to manufacturers proper shuttle will generally travel from the back line of the court to just short of the long doubles service line on the opposite side of the net, with a full underhand hit from an average player. [9]

Shuttlecock at a badminton court in Penang, Malaysia. Shuttlecock on a badminton court.jpg
Shuttlecock at a badminton court in Penang, Malaysia.

The cost of good quality feathers is similar to that of good quality plastics, but plastics are far more durable, typically lasting many matches without any impairment to their flight. Feather shuttles are easily damaged and should be replaced every three or four games or sooner if they are damaged and do not fly straight. Damaged shuttles interfere with play as any impairment may misdirect the flight of the shuttlecock.

Most experienced and skillful players greatly prefer feathers, and serious tournaments or leagues are always played using feather shuttlecocks of the highest quality. [10]

The playing characteristics of plastics and feathers are substantially different. Plastics fly more slowly on initial impact, but slow down less towards the end of their flight. While feathers tend to drop straight down on a clear shot, plastics never quite return to a straight drop, falling more on a diagonal. Feather shuttles may come off the strings at speeds in excess of 320 km/h (200 mph) but slow down faster as they drop.

See also

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References

  1. "cock | Origin and meaning of cock by Online Etymology Dictionary". www.etymonline.com. Archived from the original on 2019-03-04. Retrieved 2019-01-10.
  2. Whittemore, Frank. "Badminton Equipment Regulations". SportsRec. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  3. "Shuttlecock Trivia". www.xdcbadminton.co.uk. 2019-10-09. Retrieved 2021-01-05.
  4. "Badminton Shuttle - All You Need to Know About the Badminton Projectile". The Badminton Guide. 2020-01-05. Retrieved 2022-04-08.
  5. Lee, David (20 January 2020). "Badminton: World body to allow synthetic shuttles from 2021, Singapore's Loh Kean Yew says move towards sustainability is good". The Straits Times.
  6. "Making Birdies: How Shuttlecocks Are Made". Official Badminton. Official Badminton. Archived from the original on 8 December 2015. Retrieved 24 February 2015.
  7. Kiley, Brendan (July 24, 2013). "The Rise of the Shuttlecock". The Stranger. Archived from the original on July 27, 2019. Retrieved August 13, 2016.
  8. "Yonex Shuttle News" (PDF). www.yonex.ch/. Yonex. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  9. Adapted from various Shuttlecock Manufacturer's recommendations - RSL, Yonex, Carleton, among others by J. Wigglesworth. May 2015
  10. "BWF's tournament sanctioned shuttlecocks". Badminton World Federation site. Archived from the original on 2013-04-28. Retrieved 2011-11-01.

How to choose a Shuttlecock? [Full Buying Guide]