Siege of Brest (1386)

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Siege of Brest
Part of the Hundred Years’ War
Siege du chateau de Brest.jpg
The siege depicted by the Master of Anthony of Burgundy in MS BnF Fr 2643-6 of Froissart's Chronicles
Date1386
Location
Result English relieved Brest
Belligerents
Armoiries Bretagne - Arms of Brittany.svg Duchy of Brittany Royal Arms of England (1340-1367).svg Kingdom of England
Commanders and leaders
Armoiries Bretagne - Arms of Brittany.svg John IV, Duke of Brittany RoacheArms.png John Roches
Thomas Asshenden
Relief force:

The siege of Brest in 1386 was a siege by forces led by John IV, Duke of Brittany, against English-occupied Brest during the Hundred Years’ War. The siege was relieved by an English army commanded by John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. [1]

Citations

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