South Province (Western Australia)

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South Province was an electoral province of the Legislative Council of Western Australia between 1900 and 1989. It elected three members between 1900 and 1965 and two members between 1965 and 1989.

Western Australian Legislative Council upper house of the Legislature of the state of Western Australia

The Western Australian Legislative Council is the upper house of the Parliament of Western Australia, a state of Australia. It is regarded as a house of review for legislation passed by the Legislative Assembly, the lower house. The two Houses of Parliament sit in Parliament House in the state capital, Perth.

Members

Three members (1900–1965)
Member 1PartyTermMember 2PartyTermMember 3PartyTerm
  Thomas Brimage None1900–1906  John Glowrey None1900–1904  George Bellingham None1900–1908
   William Oats None1904–1910 
 John GlowreyNone1906–1910  
   Sir John Kirwan None1908–1910
  Independent 1910–1912  Jabez Dodd Labor 1910–1917  Independent 1910–1946
  James Cornell Labor 1912–1917  
  Nat. Labor 1917–1924  Nat. Labor 1917–1924 
  Nationalist 1924–1945  Nationalist 1924–1928 
   George Rainsford Nationalist 1928 
   Charles Williams Labor 1928–1948 
  Liberal 1945–1946  
    George Bennetts Labor 1946–1950
  Robert Boylen Labor 1947–1950  
   John Cunningham Liberal 1948–1950 
Major reconstitution in 1950 – existing South Province members effectively swapped with existing South-East Province members.
  Jack Thomson Country 1950–1965  Hugh Roche Country 1950–1960  Anthony Loton Country 1950–1965
   Sydney Thompson Country 1960–1965 

Two members (1965–1989)
Member 1PartyTermMember 2PartyTerm
  Edward House Country 1965–1971 Jack Thomson Country 1965–1974
  David Wordsworth Liberal 1971–1989 
   Thomas Knight Liberal 1974–1986
   John Caldwell National 1986–1989

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This is a list of members of the Western Australian Legislative Council from 22 May 1962 to 21 May 1965.

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1965 Western Australian state election

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 20 February 1965 to elect all 50 members to the Legislative Assembly and 15 members to the 30-seat Legislative Council. The Liberal-Country coalition government, led by Premier Sir David Brand, won a third term in office against the Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader Albert Hawke.

The Metropolitan-Suburban Province was a three-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in the metropolitan region of Perth. It was created by the Constitution Acts Amendment Act 1899, and became effective on 29 August 1900 following a special election to fill all three seats. Historically taking in many coastal and riverside areas in the western suburbs of Perth, it was considered safe for the Nationalist Party for most of its existence.

The North Metropolitan Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in metropolitan Perth. It was one of several metropolitan seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965. At each election, held every three years, one of the two seats was vacated, and the trend in North Metropolitan reflected statewide trends and swings rather than being safe for either of the major parties.

The North-East Metropolitan Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in metropolitan Perth. It was one of several metropolitan seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965. The province was very safe for the Labor Party, which held most or all of the component Assembly seats.

The South-East Metropolitan Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in metropolitan Perth. It was one of several metropolitan seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965. The province, with its mix of safe Labor and Liberal Assembly seats, also produced mixed fortunes for both parties until 1983, when a redistribution turned it into a safe Labor seat and the two sitting Liberal members successfully transferred to the new South Central Metropolitan Province seat.

The South Metropolitan Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in metropolitan Perth. It was one of several metropolitan seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965. The province was very safe for the Labor Party, which held most or all of the component Assembly seats.

The Lower Central Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in the South West and Great Southern regions of the state. It was one of several rural seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965. Although initially a safe seat for the Country Party, it usually only contained one safe Assembly seat for that party, and by 1983, the Liberal Party were able to maintain both seats comfortably.

The Lower North Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in the central and northern parts of the state. For nearly its entire existence, it had the lowest enrolment of any province in the Council. It was one of several rural seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965.

The Upper West Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in the Mid West region of the state. It was one of several rural seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965.

The Lower West Province was a two-member electoral province of the Western Australian Legislative Council, located in the Peel and South West region of the state. It was one of several rural seats created following the enactment of the Constitution Acts Amendment Act (No.2) 1963, and became effective on 22 May 1965. It was consistently a safe seat for the Liberal Party who were able to maintain both seats comfortably.

Electoral regions of Western Australia multi-member electoral region of the Western Australian Legislative Council

The Western Australian Legislative Council is elected from six multi-member electoral regions, which are in turn composed of electoral districts which are used to elect the Legislative Assembly. The current number of electoral regions was established on 22 May 1989. Initially, the South West and Northern Metropolitan regions returned seven members to the Legislative Council, while the other regions each returned five members. This arrangement was changed to have each region return six members for the 2008 Western Australian election, increasing the total number of members from 34 to 36. Before 1989 electoral divisions for the Legislative Council were known as electoral provinces.

South-West Province was an electoral province of the Legislative Council of Western Australia between 1894 and 1989. It elected three members between 1894 and 1965 and two members between 1965 and 1989.

West Province was an electoral province of the Legislative Council of Western Australia between 1894 and 1989. It elected three members from 1894 to 1965 and two members from 1965 to 1989.

North Province was an electoral province of the Legislative Council of Western Australia between 1894 and 1989. It elected three members between 1894 and 1965 and two members between 1965 and 1989.

Central Province was an electoral province of the Legislative Council of Western Australia between 1894 and 1989. It elected three members between 1894 and 1965 and two members between 1965 and 1989.

References

David William Black is a Western Australian historian. He has lectured and written extensively on Australian and Western Australian history, especially political history. He was Professor in History and Politics in the School of Social Sciences and Asian Languages at Curtin University of Technology until his retirement in 2002, and is now Professor Emeritus. He is currently Chairperson of the Parliamentary History Advisory Committee, and a Parliamentary Fellow (History).