Status quo

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Status quo is a Latin phrase meaning the existing state of affairs, particularly with regard to social, political, religious or military issues. [1] In the sociological sense, the status quo refers to the current state of social structure and/or values. [2] With regard to policy debate, it means how conditions are, contrasted with a possible change. For example: "The countries are now trying to maintain the status quo with regard to their nuclear arsenals." To maintain the status quo is to keep things the way they presently are.

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The related phrase status quo ante , literally "the status before", refers to the state of affairs that existed previously. [3]

Political usage

Via social movements the status quo might be overhauled. These seek to alleviate or prevent a particular issue and often to shape social feeling and cultural expression of a society or nation. [4] The status quo is at least in part rejected by their protagonists progressives leading the movement. [5]

Advocating to improve the status quo is a persuasive rhetorical device. This is sometimes critiqued as a policy of deliberate ambiguity as not formalizing or defining the adverse situation.

In democratic meetings, a casting vote will often be subject to a custom that is cast per the status quo, the heart of Speaker Denison's rule. Clark Kerr reportedly said: "The status quo is the only solution that cannot be vetoed". [6]

Karl Marx viewed organized religion as a means for the bourgeoisie to keep the proletariat content with an unequal status quo. [7]

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References

  1. "status quo". Merriam-Webster Dictionary .
  2. Dr. C. Michael Botterweck. "Glossary for Sociology 100". academics.triton.edu. Retrieved 8 February 2015.
  3. "status quo ante". Merriam-Webster Dictionary .
  4. Clark, Pamela (2000). "The Social Climate". The Optimal Environment: Part Four. www.featherpicking.com. Retrieved 2009-03-11.
  5. "Status Quo - Dictionary Definition". vocabulary.com. vocabulary.com. Retrieved 8 February 2015.
  6. Seymour, Daniel (2015-12-07). Momentum: The Responsibility Paradigm and Virtuous Cycles of Change in Colleges and Universities. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN   9781475821048.
  7. Boundless. "Religion and Social Control." Boundless Sociology. Boundless, 27 Jun. 2014. Retrieved 08 Feb. 2015