Tax on trees

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Tax on trees was a tax imposed in USSR in 1944 on fruit trees. The tax made it expensive to have trees on a farm, and had the unintended consequence of causing a mass felling of trees by Soviet farmers. This subsequently led to shortage of fruit.

A tax is a mandatory financial charge or some other type of levy imposed upon a taxpayer by a governmental organization in order to fund various public expenditures. A failure to pay, along with evasion of or resistance to taxation, is punishable by law. Taxes consist of direct or indirect taxes and may be paid in money or as its labour equivalent.

The idea proposed by the Minister Arseny Zverev, and Joseph Stalin failed to foresee the problems it would produce. The tax was repealed in 1954, by Georgy Malenkov, when taxes were reduced by 60 per cent for farmers. [1]

Arseny Zverev Soviet politician

Arseny Grigoryevich Zverev was a Soviet Russian politician, economist and statesman whose career spanned the rules of Stalin and Khrushchev, but culminated during the Stalin years. Zverev was born in a little village just outside Moscow. After years in local politics, he rose to prominence as a Deputy Commissar of Finance, but he also held other lesser posts such as a member of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union.

Joseph Stalin Soviet leader

Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin was a Georgian revolutionary and Soviet politician. He led the Soviet Union from the mid–1920s until 1953 as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1922–1952) and Premier (1941–1953). While initially presiding over a collective leadership as first among equals, he ultimately consolidated enough power to become the country's de facto dictator by the 1930s. A communist ideologically committed to the Leninist interpretation of Marxism, Stalin helped to formalise these ideas as Marxism–Leninism, while his own policies became known as Stalinism.

Georgy Malenkov Soviet politician

Georgy Maximilianovich Malenkov was a Soviet politician who briefly succeeded Joseph Stalin as the absolute leader of the Soviet Union. However, at the insistence of the rest of the Presidium, he relinquished control over the party in exchange for remaining first among equals as the country's Premier. Subsequently, Malenkov became embroiled in a power struggle ultimately culminating in his removal from the premiership in 1955 and the Presidium in 1957.

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