Temple Owls men's basketball

Last updated
Temple Owls
Basketball current event.svg 2019–20 Temple Owls men's basketball team
Temple T logo.svg
UniversityTemple University
All-time record1940-1092
Head coach Aaron McKie (1st season)
Conference The American
Location Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Arena Liacouras Center (Capacity: 10,206)
NicknameOwls
ColorsCherry and White [1]
         
Uniforms
Kit body thinsidesonwhite.png
Kit body basketball.svg
Kit shorts blanksides2.png
Kit shorts.svg
Home
Kit body thinwhitesides.png
Kit body basketball.svg
Kit shorts whitesides2.png
Kit shorts.svg
Away
Kit body thinwhitesides.png
Kit body basketball.svg
Kit shorts whitesides2.png
Kit shorts.svg
Alternate
Pre-tournament Premo-Porretta Champions
1938
Pre-tournament Helms Champions
1938
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1956, 1958
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1944, 1956, 1958, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1999, 2001
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1956, 1958, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1999, 2001
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1944, 1956, 1958, 1964, 1967, 1970, 1972, 1979, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2016, 2019
Conference Tournament Champions
1985, 1987, 1988, 1990, 2000, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2010
Conference Regular Season Champions
1937, 1938, 1964, 1967, 1969, 1972, 1977, 1979, 1982, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2010, 2012, 2016

The Temple Owls men's basketball team represents Temple University in the sport of basketball. The Owls compete in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I as a member of the American Athletic Conference (The American). They play their home games in the Liacouras Center on the university's main campus in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and are currently led by head coach Aaron Mckie. Temple is the fifth-most winningest NCAA Division I men's college basketball program of all time, with 1903 wins at the end of the 2017–18 season.

Contents

On March 7, 2012, the Temple Owls announced that they would be rejoining the Big East Conference for all sports in 2013 after 31 years in the Atlantic 10 Conference, with the Owls football team membership beginning in the 2012 season. However, before Temple became an all-sports member of the Big East, the conference split along football lines. The league's non-FBS football schools formed a new Big East in 2013, while Temple and the remaining football members remained in the old conference, but renamed it the American Athletic Conference.

History

The Temple Owls became the first National Invitation Tournament (NIT) champions in 1938, one year before the inception of the NCAA Tournament. The Owls were retroactively recognized by the Premo-Porretta Power Poll and the Helms Athletic Foundation as the national champion for the 1937–38 season. [2] Temple again won the NIT championship in 1969.

During the 1950s, the Temple basketball team made two NCAA Final Four appearances in (1956, 1958) under legendary Head Coach Harry Litwack. Litwack would be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame after concluding a 21-year coaching career that included 373 wins.

Head Coach John Chaney, also a Hall of Famer, won a total of 741 career games (312 losses) and took Temple to the NCAA tournament 17 times in 24 seasons with the Owls. His teams won the Atlantic 10 regular season championship eight times, while winning the A-10 Tournament six times. His 1987–88 Owls team entered the NCAA Tournament ranked No. 1 in the country, but lost in the Elite Eight to Duke. Chaney reached the Elite Eight on five different occasions and was the consensus National Coach of the Year in 1988. On March 13, 2006, Chaney retired from coaching. [3]

On April 10, 2006, Penn head coach and La Salle alumnus Fran Dunphy was named the new head coach. Dunphy had coached the Quakers for 17 straight seasons prior to the move. After struggling his first year, the Owls won the A-10 Tournament for three consecutive years in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The Owls received bids to the NCAA Tournament for six straight years under Dunphy (2008–2013). However, the Owls only won a game in the Tournament twice during that time period. Since Temple joined the American Athletic Conference in 2013, the Owls have struggled, making the NCAA Tournament only in 2016 and 2019.

After the 2018 season it was announced that former Owls standout and current assistant coach Aaron McKie would take over for Fran beginning in 2019.

Players Mark Macon, Juan Ignacio Sanchez, Eddie Jones, Lavoy Allen, Aaron McKie, Tim Perry and Mardy Collins are just a few who have gone on to play in the NBA.

Rivalries

As a member of the Big 5, the Owls have long-standing rivalries with Villanova, Penn, Saint Joseph's, and La Salle. The Owls have the most Big 5 titles to date, with 27. However, they have not won an outright Big 5 title since the 2000–01 season. The Owls won their most recent Big 5 title in 2012–13, going 3-1 in Big 5 play and splitting the title with La Salle. During Big 5 games, the Temple student section unfurls long banners about the opposing team, which has been a Big 5 trademark for Temple.

Other rivals include UMass, Cincinnati, and Connecticut. Temple is in the American Athletic Conference with both Cincinnati and UConn and play them regularly in the regular season. When Temple was in the A-10, head coach John Chaney had a personal rivalry with UMass head coach John Calipari.

Awards and honors

Retired numbers

Temple Owls retired numbers
No.PlayerYears
5 Guy Rodgers 1955–1958
6 Hal Lear 1953–1956
12 Mark Macon 1987–1991
20 Bill Mlkvy 1949–1952

National Awards

All Americans

National Coach of the Year

Conference awards

Atlantic 10 Conference (1982-2013)

  • Atlantic 10 Coach of the Year [5]

American Athletic Conference (2013-Present)

  • American Athletic Conference Most Improved Player
    • Nate Pierre-Louis - 2019 [6]
  • American Athletic Conference Coach of the Year

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

Owls in pro basketball

NBA Drafted players

YearRoundOverallPlayerTeam
2011250 Lavoy Allen Philadelphia 76ers
2006129 Mardy Collins New York Knicks
2000248 Mark Karcher Philadelphia 76ers
1997237 Marc Jackson Golden State Warriors
1994110 Eddie Jones Los Angeles Lakers
117 Aaron McKie Portland Trail Blazers
199118 Mark Macon Denver Nuggets
118 Duane Causwell Sacramento Kings
198817 Tim Perry Phoenix Suns
1987227 Nate Blackwell San Antonio Spurs
1985478 Granger Hall Phoenix Suns
6124Charles Rayne Phoenix Suns
1984115 Terence Stansbury Dallas Mavericks
8167Jim McLoughlin Los Angeles Clippers
19819202Ron Wister Philadelphia 76ers
1979481Ricky Reed Los Angeles Lakers
19789181Tim Claxton Philadelphia 76ers
1974587Joe Newman Detroit Pistons
1972230 Ollie Johnson Portland Trail Blazers
1969223 John Baum Chicago Bulls
340 Eddie Mast New York Knicks
570Joe Cromer Philadelphia 76ers
19689118 Clarence Brookins Philadelphia 76ers
15187 John Baum Los Angeles Lakers
1966440Jim Williams Chicago Bulls
1960215 Bill Kennedy Philadelphia Warriors
1958 Guy Rodgers Philadelphia Warriors
752Jay Norman Philadelphia Warriors
968Tink Van Patton Philadelphia Warriors
195617 Hal Lear Philadelphia Warriors
19557Al Didriksen Philadelphia Warriors
8Harry Silcox Philadelphia Warriors
1952 Bill Mlkvy Philadelphia Warriors
19505 Ike Borsavage Philadelphia Warriors

[9]


Season-by-season results

The following is a list of Temple Owls men's basketball seasons, with records and notable accomplishments.

Statistics overview
SeasonCoachOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Charles M. Williams (Independent)(1894–1899)
1894–95Charles M. Williams8–3
1895–96Charles M. Williams15–7
1896–97Charles M. Williams10–11
1897–98Charles M. Williams22–5
1898–99Charles M. Williams18–6
Charles M. Williams:73–32
John Rogers (Independent)(1899–1900)
1899–1900John Rogers14–8
John Rogers:14–8
1900–01No varsity team
Harry Shindle Wingert (Independent)(1901–1905)
1901–02Harry Shindle Wingert8–3
1902–03Harry Shindle Wingert5–6
1903–04Harry Shindle Wingert4–4
1904–05Harry Shindle Wingert3–5
Harry Shindle Wingert:20–18
John Crescenzo(Independent)(1905–1908)
1905–06John Crescenzo3–4
1906–07John Crescenzo5–4
1907–08John Crescenzo6–2
John Crescenzo:14–10
Edward McCone(Independent)(1908–1909)
1908–09Edward McCone8–3
Edward McCone:8–3
Frederick Prosch, Jr.(Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1909–1913)
1909–10Frederick Prosch, Jr.4–6
1910–11Frederick Prosch, Jr.3–5
1911–12Frederick Prosch, Jr.4–4
1912–13Frederick Prosch, Jr.6–5
Frederick Prosch, Jr.:17–20
William Nicolai (Independent)(1913–1917)
1913–14William Nicolai5–7
1914–15William Nicolai9–4
1915–16William Nicolai7–6
1916–17William Nicolai10–9
William Nicolai:31–26
Elwood Geiges (Independent)(1917–1918)
1917–18Elwood Geiges8–7
Elwood Geiges:8–7
1918–19No varsity team due to World War I
M. Francois D'Eliscu (Independent)(1919–1923)
1919–20M. Francois D'Eliscu9–7
1920–21M. Francois D'Eliscu7–4
1921–22M. Francois D'Eliscu4–8
1922–23M. Francois D'Eliscu10–4
M. Francois D'Eliscu:29–23
Samuel Dienes(Independent)(1923–1926)
1923–24Samuel Dienes15–5
1924–25Samuel Dienes12–10
1925–26Samuel Dienes12–6
Samuel Dienes:39–21
James Usilton (Independent)(1926–1932)
1926–27James Usilton14–5
1927–28James Usilton17–5
1928–29James Usilton16–4
1929–30James Usilton18–3
1930–31James Usilton17–4
1931–32James Usilton13–7
James Usilton(East Intercollegiate Conference)(1932–1939)
1932–33James Usilton21–35–32nd
1933–34James Usilton9–125-5T-3rd
1934–35James Usilton17–75-32nd
1935–36James Usilton18–66-4T-2nd
1936–37James Usilton17–67-3T-1st
1937–38 James Usilton23–29–11st NIT Champions
1938–39James Usilton16–45–21st
James Usilton:205–7941–25
Ernest Messikomer(Independent)(1939–1942)
1939–40Ernest Messikomer13–10
1940–41Ernest Messikomer12–9
1941–42Ernest Messikomer10–8
Ernest Messikomer:35–27
Josh Cody (Independent)(1942–1952)
1942–43Josh Cody11–11
1943–44Josh Cody14–9- NCAA Elite Eight
1944–45Josh Cody16–7
1945–46Josh Cody12–8
1946–-47Josh Cody8–12
1947–48Josh Cody12–11
1948–49Josh Cody14–9
1949–50Josh Cody14–10
1950–51Josh Cody12–13
1951–52Josh Cody9–15
Josh Cody:122–104
Harry Litwack (Independent)(1952–1958)
1952–53Harry Litwack16–10
1953–54Harry Litwack15–12
1954–55Harry Litwack11–10
1955–56Harry Litwack27–4 NCAA Final Four
1956–57Harry Litwack20–9 NIT 3rd Place Game
1957–58Harry Litwack27–3 NCAA Final Four
Harry Litwack(Middle Atlantic Conference)(1958–1964)
1958–59Harry Litwack6–194–79th
1959–60Harry Litwack17–99–23rd NIT First Round
1960–61Harry Litwack20–89–12nd NIT Quarterfinals
1961–62Harry Litwack18–98–22nd NIT Quarterfinals
1962–63Harry Litwack15–76–34th
1963–64Harry Litwack17–86–11st NCAA First Round
Harry Litwack(Independent)(1964–1969)
1964–65Harry Litwack14–10
1965–66Harry Litwack21–7 NIT Quarterfinals
1966–67Harry Litwack20–8 NCAA First Round
1967–68Harry Litwack19–9 NIT First Round
1968–69Harry Litwack22–8 NIT Champions
Harry Litwack(Middle Atlantic Conference)(1969–1973)
1969–70Harry Litwack15–132–3T-3rd (East) NCAA First Round
1970–71Harry Litwack13–123–34th (East)
1971–72Harry Litwack23–86–01st (East) NCAA First Round
1972–73Harry Litwack20–85–12nd (East)
Harry Litwack:373–19358–23
Don Casey (Middle Atlantic Conference)(1973–1974)
1973–74Don Casey16–94–23rd (East)
Don Casey(East Coast Conference)(1973–1982)
1974–75Don Casey7–194–23rd (East)
1975–76Don Casey9–183–2T-2nd (East)
1976–77Don Casey17–114–1T-1st
1977–78Don Casey24–54–12nd (East)
1978–79Don Casey25–413–01st (East) NCAA Round of 32
1979–80Don Casey14–128–32nd (East)
1980–81Don Casey20–89–2T-2nd (East)
1981–82Don Casey19–811–01st
Don Casey:151–94
John Chaney (Atlantic 10 Conference)(1982–2006)
1982–83John Chaney14–155–9
1983–84John Chaney26–518–01st NCAA Second Round
1984–85John Chaney25–615–31st NCAA Second Round
1985–86John Chaney25–615–3T-2nd NCAA Second Round
1986–87John Chaney32–417–11st NCAA Second Round
1987–88John Chaney32–218–01st NCAA Elite Eight
1988–89John Chaney18–1215–32nd NIT First Round
1989–90John Chaney20–1115–31st NCAA First Round
1990–91John Chaney24–1013–52nd NCAA Elite Eight
1991–92John Chaney17–1311–52nd NCAA First Round
1992–93John Chaney30-413-3T-2nd NCAA Elite Eight
1993-94John Chaney23–812–42nd NCAA Second Round
1994–95John Chaney19–1110–6T-2nd NCAA First Round
1995–96John Chaney20–1312–42nd (East) NCAA Second Round
1996–97John Chaney20–1110–64th (East) NCAA Second Round
1997–98John Chaney21–913–31st (East) NCAA First Round
1998–99John Chaney24–1113–31st (East) NCAA Elite Eight
1999–2000John Chaney27–614–21st (East) NCAA Second Round
2000–01 John Chaney24–1312–4T-2nd NCAA Elite Eight
2001–02 John Chaney18–1512–4T-1st (East) NIT Semifinals
2002–03 John Chaney18–1610–6T-2nd (East) NIT Quarterfinals
2003–04 John Chaney15–149–72nd (East) NIT First Round
2004–05 John Chaney16–1411–52nd (East) NIT First Round
2005–06 John Chaney17–168–8T–7th NIT Opening Round
John Chaney:516–253296–100
Fran Dunphy (Atlantic 10 Conference)(2006–2013)
2006–07 Fran Dunphy12–186–1010th
2007–08 Fran Dunphy21–1311–5T–2nd NCAA First Round
2008–09 Fran Dunphy22–1211–5T–2nd NCAA First Round
2009–10 Fran Dunphy29–614–21st NCAA First Round
2010–11 Fran Dunphy26–814–22nd NCAA Third Round
2011–12 Fran Dunphy24–813–31st NCAA Second Round
2012–13 Fran Dunphy24–1011–5T–3rd NCAA Third Round
Fran Dunphy(American Athletic Conference)(2013–2019)
2013–14 Fran Dunphy9–224–149th
2014–15 Fran Dunphy26–1113–5T–3rd NIT Semifinals
2015–16 Fran Dunphy21–1114–41st NCAA First Round
2016–17 Fran Dunphy16–167–118th
2017–18 Fran Dunphy17–158–107th NIT First Round
2018–19 Fran Dunphy23–813–53rd NCAA First Four
Fran Dunphy:270–153 (.638)139–81 (.632)
Aaron Mckie (American Athletic Conference)(2019–present)
2019-20 Aaron Mckie14-176-1210th
Aaron Mckie:14–17 (.452)6–12 (.333)
Total:1926–1077 (.641)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

[10] [11]

Postseason

NCAA tournament results

The Owls have appeared in the NCAA Tournament 33 times. Their combined record is 33–33.

YearSeedRoundOpponentResult
1944 Elite Eight
Regional 3rd Place Game
Ohio State
Catholic
L 47–57
W 55–35
1956 First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Holy Cross
Connecticut
Canisius
Iowa
SMU
W 74–72
W 65–59
W 60–58
L 76–83
W 90–81
1958 Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Maryland
Dartmouth
Kentucky
Kansas State
W 71–67
W 69–50
L 60–61
W 67–57
1964 First RoundConnecticutL 48–53
1967 First RoundSt. John'sL 53–57
1970 First RoundSouth CarolinaL 51–53
1972 First RoundWest VirginiaL 71–77
1979 #7First Round#10 St. John'sL 70–75
1984 #8First Round
Second Round
#9 St. John's
#1 North Carolina
W 65–63
L 66–77
1985 #8First Round
Second Round
#9 Virginia Tech
#1 Georgetown
W 60–57
L 46–63
1986 #9First Round
Second Round
#8 Jacksonville
#1 Kansas
W 61–50 OT
L 43–65
1987 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Southern
#10 LSU
W 75–56
L 62–72
1988 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Lehigh
#8 Georgetown
#13 Richmond
#2 Duke
W 87–73
W 74–53
W 69–47
L 53–63
1990 #11First Round#6 St. John'sL 65–81
1991 #10First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#7 Purdue
#15 Richmond
#3 Oklahoma State
#1 North Carolina
W 80–63
W 77–64
W 72–63 OT
L 72–75
1992 #11First Round#6 MichiganL 66–73
1993 #7First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#10 Missouri
#15 Santa Clara
#3 Vanderbilt
#1 Michigan
W 75–61
W 68–57
W 67–59
L 72–77
1994 #4First Round
Second Round
#13 Drexel
#5 Indiana
W 61–39
L 58–67
1995 #7First Round#10 CincinnatiL 71–77
1996 #7First Round
Second Round
#10 Oklahoma
#2 Cincinnati
W 61–43
L 65–78
1997 #9First Round
Second Round
#8 Ole Miss
#1 Minnesota
W 62–40
L 57–76
1998 #7First Round#10 West VirginiaL 52–82
1999 #6First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#11 Kent State
#3 Cincinnati
#10 Purdue
#1 Duke
W 61–54
W 64–54
W 77–55
L 64–85
2000 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Lafayette
#10 Seton Hall
W 73–47
L 65–67 OT
2001 #11First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#6 Texas
#3 Florida
#7 Penn State
#1 Michigan State
W 79–65
W 75–54
W 84–72
L 62–69
2008 #12First Round#5 Michigan StateL 61–72
2009 #11First Round#6 Arizona StateL 57–66
2010 #5First Round#12 CornellL 65–78
2011 #7Second Round
Third Round
#10 Penn State
#2 San Diego State
W 66–64
L 64–71 2OT
2012 #5Second Round#12 South FloridaL 44–58
2013 #9Second Round
Third Round
#8 NC State
#1 Indiana
W 76–72
L 52–58
2016 #10First Round#7 IowaL 70–72 OT
2019 #11First Four#11 BelmontL 70–81

NIT results

The Owls have appeared in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) 18 times. Their combined record is 23–16. They are two time NIT champions (1938, 1969).

YearRoundOpponentResult
1938 Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Finals
Bradley
Oklahoma A&M
Colorado
W 53–40
W 56–55
W 60–36
1957 Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Dayton
Bradley
St. Bonaventure
W 77–66
L 66–77
W 67–50
1960 First RoundDaytonL 51–72
1961 First Round
Quarterfinals
Army
Dayton
W 79–65
L 62–60
1962 First Round
Quarterfinals
Providence
Loyola–Chicago
W 80–78
L 64–75
1966 First Round
Quarterfinals
Virginia Tech
BYU
W 88–73
L 78–90
1968 First RoundKansasL 76–82
1969 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Finals
Florida
Saint Peter's
Tennessee
Boston College
W 82–66
W 94–78
W 63–58
W 89–76
1978 First RoundTexasL 58–72
1981 First Round
Second Round
Clemson
West Virginia
W 90–82
L 76–77
1982 First RoundGeorgiaL 60–73
1989 First RoundRichmondL 56–70
2002 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Fresno State
Louisville
Villanova
Memphis
Syracuse
W 81–75
W 65–62
W 63–57
L 77–79
W 65–64
2003 Opening Round
First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Drexel
Boston College
Rhode Island
Minnesota
W 68–59
W 75–62
W 61–53
L 58–63
2004 First RoundRutgersL 71–76
2005 First RoundVirginia TechL 50–60
2006 Opening RoundAkronL 73–80
2015 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Bucknell
George Washington
Louisiana Tech
Miami (FL)
W 73–67
W 90–77
W 77–59
L 57–60
2018 First RoundPenn StateL 57–63

Related Research Articles

John Chaney is an American retired college basketball coach, best known for his success at Temple University.

Aaron McKie American basketball player-coach

Aaron Fitzgerald McKie is an American basketball coach and former professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is currently the head coach for his alma mater Temple University. Selected by the Portland Trail Blazers 17th overall in the 1994 NBA Draft, McKie spent time as a point guard, shooting guard or small forward throughout his professional playing career from 1994 to 2007.

Temple Owls intercollegiate sports teams of Temple University

The Temple Owls are the athletic teams that represent Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The school's sports teams are called the Owls. The current athletic director is Patrick Kraft.

Fran Dunphy American basketball coach

Francis Joseph Dunphy is a former American college basketball coach. He is the former men's basketball coach at Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania. He succeeded John Chaney in 2006 and was succeeded by Aaron McKie in 2019.

2009–10 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2009–10 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University in the 2009–10 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were led by head coach Fran Dunphy and played their home games at the Liacouras Center. The Owls are members of the Atlantic 10 Conference. They finished the season 29–6, 14–2 in A-10 play to claim a share of the regular season championship. They won the 2010 Atlantic 10 Men's Basketball Tournament for the third consecutive year to receive the conferences automatic bid to the 2010 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. They received a 5 seed in the East Region where they were upset in the first round by 12 seed Cornell.

2010–11 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2010–11 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University in the 2010–11 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team played their home games at the Liacouras Center, which has a capacity of 10,206. The Owls were in their 29th season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference. In the previous season, Temple Owls gained a record of 29–6 and reached the NCAA Tournament. The team returned three starters from the previous season, but leading scorer Ryan Brooks and point guard Luis Guzman left, having graduated. They were replaced by new players Aaron Brown, Anthony Lee, and Jimmy McDonnell and graduate student transfer Dutch Gaitley. In the off-season, other Atlantic 10 coaches predicted that Temple Owls would win the league.

2008–09 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2008–09 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University in the 2008–09 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were led by head coach Fran Dunphy and played their home games at the Liacouras Center. The Owls are members of the Atlantic 10 Conference. They finished the season 22–12 and 11–5 in A-10 play. They won the 2009 Atlantic 10 Men's Basketball Tournament for the second consecutive year to receive the conference's automatic bid to the 2009 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.

Matt Langel is the head coach for the Colgate Raiders men's basketball team. He previously served as an assistant for the Temple Owls men's basketball team for five seasons under Fran Dunphy.

Juan Fernández (basketball) Argentine basketball player

Juan Manuel "Lobito" Fernández is an Argentine professional basketball player for Pallacanestro Trieste of the Italian Lega Basket Serie A (LBA). His father, Gustavo, was a point guard for a number of professional basketball teams in Argentina. Pepe Sánchez convinced Fernández to play basketball at his alma mater, Temple University, and Fernández joined the Temple Owls team in December 2008. As a sophomore, he was named Atlantic 10 Tournament Most Valuable Player. After struggling through a prolonged shooting slump as a junior, he hit an off-balance 18-foot shot with .4 seconds remaining to defeat Penn State in the 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament and was named to the All-Atlantic 10 Third Team. In addition to his college exploits, he defended Argentina bringing home a gold medal at the 2008 Under-18 World Championship.

2011–12 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2011–12 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University in the 2011–12 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team played their home games at the Liacouras Center, which has a capacity of 10,206; as well as one game each at the Palestra and Wells Fargo Center. They are in their 30th season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference. In their previous season, Temple compiled a record of 26–8 and reached the NCAA Tournament. The team returned four starters from the previous season, but lost power forward Lavoy Allen to graduation. He is replaced by incoming recruit Will Cummings and transfer Dalton Pepper. Anthony Lee will be eligible after red shirting last year.

2007–08 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2007–08 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University in the 2007–08 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were led by head coach Fran Dunphy and played their home games at the Liacouras Center. The Owls are members of the Atlantic 10 Conference. They finished the season 21–13 and 11–5 in A-10 play. They won the 2008 Atlantic 10 Men's Basketball Tournament to receive the conference's automatic bid to the 2008 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.

2005–06 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2005–06 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University in the 2005–06 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were led by head coach John Chaney and played their home games at the Liacouras Center. The Owls are members of the Atlantic 10 Conference. They finished the season 17–15, 8–8 in A-10 play, and reached the 2006 National Invitation Tournament. Chaney retired at the conclusion of the season.

2012–13 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2012–13 Temple Owls basketball team represented Temple University during the 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Owls, led by seventh year head coach Fran Dunphy, played their home games at the Liacouras Center and were members of the Atlantic 10 Conference. They finished the season 24–10, 11–5 in A-10 play to finish in a three way tie for third place. They lost in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic 10 Tournament to Massachusetts. They received an at-large bid to the 2013 NCAA Tournament where they defeated North Carolina State in the second round before losing in the third round to Indiana.

Khalif Wyatt American basketball player

Khalif Wyatt is an American professional basketball player for Champagne Châlons-Reims in the Pro A. He was the Atlantic 10 Conference Player of the Year as a college basketball senior in the 2012–13 season, after leading the Owls to the Round of 32 in the 2013 NCAA Tournament. Wyatt led Temple in scoring in his final college season, with a 20.5 points per game average.

2014–15 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2014–15 Temple Owls basketball team represented Temple University during the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Owls, led by ninth year head coach Fran Dunphy, played their home games at the Liacouras Center and were members the American Athletic Conference. They finished the season 26–11, 13–5 in AAC play to finish in a tie for third place. They advanced to the semifinals of the American Athletic Tournament to SMU. They were invited to the National Invitation Tournament where they defeated Bucknell in the first round, George Washington in the second round, and Louisiana Tech in the quarterfinals to advance to the semifinals where they lost to Miami (FL).

2015–16 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2015–16 Temple Owls basketball team represented Temple University during the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Owls, led by tenth year head coach Fran Dunphy, played their home games at the Liacouras Center and were members the American Athletic Conference. They finished the season with a record 21–12, 14–4 in AAC play to win the regular season championship. They defeated South Florida in the quarterfinals of the AAC Tournament to advance to the semifinals where they lost to UConn. They received an at-large bid as a #10 seed to the NCAA Tournament where they lost in the first round to Iowa.

2016–17 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2016–17 Temple Owls basketball team represented Temple University during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Owls, led by 11th-year head coach Fran Dunphy, played their home games at the Liacouras Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as members the American Athletic Conference. They finished the season 16–16, 7–11 in AAC play to finish in eighth place. They lost in the first round of the AAC Tournament to East Carolina.

2018–19 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 2018–19 Temple Owls basketball team represented Temple University during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Owls, led by head coach Fran Dunphy in his 13th and final season with the Owls, played their home games at the Liacouras Center in Philadelphia as members of the American Athletic Conference. They finished the season 23–10, 13–5 in AAC play to finish in a tie for third place. They lost in the quarterfinals of the AAC Tournament to Wichita State. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament where they lost in the First Four to Belmont.

2019–20 Temple Owls mens basketball team Temple University NCAA team

The 2019–20 Temple Owls men's basketball team represents Temple University during the 2019–20 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Owls, led by first-year head coach Aaron McKie, play their home games at the Liacouras Center in Philadelphia as a member of the American Athletic Conference.

1990–91 Temple Owls mens basketball team American college basketball season

The 1990–91 Temple Owls men's basketball team represented Temple University as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference during the 1990–91 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team was led by legendary head coach John Chaney and played their home games at McGonigle Hall. The Owls received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as No. 10 seed in the East region. Temple made a run to the Elite Eight before falling to North Carolina in the East regional final, 75–72. The team finished with a record of 24–10.

References

  1. "Temple University Logo Usage Guide" (PDF). December 4, 2017. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  2. ESPN, ed. (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York, NY: ESPN Books. p. 546. ISBN   978-0-345-51392-2.
  3. "Temple coach Chaney retires". ESPN.com. 2006-03-13. Archived from the original on 2017-07-20. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  4. 1 2 "(PDF)" (PDF). Temple University Athletics.
  5. "List of Atlantic 10 Coach of the Year Winners".
  6. "Defensive Player, Sixth Man, Most Improved and Sportsmanship Award Announced". theamerican.org.
  7. "Temple's Fran Dunphy named AAC Coach of the Year". NBC Sports Philadelphia. 10 March 2016.
  8. 1 2 3 "Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductees". NBA.com.
  9. "Draft Finder". Basketball-Reference.com.
  10. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2016-03-04.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. "Temple Owls Index - College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 2018-03-10.