The Incredible Planet

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The Incredible Planet

Incredible planet.jpg

Dust-jacket from the first edition
Author John W. Campbell, Jr.
Cover artist A. J. Donnell
Country United States
Language English
Genre Science fiction
Publisher Fantasy Press
Publication date
1949
Media type Print (hardback)
Pages 344 pp
OCLC 1462253
Preceded by The Mightiest Machine

The Incredible Planet is a science fiction fix-up novel by American author John W. Campbell, Jr.. It was published in 1949 by Fantasy Press in an edition of 3,998 copies. The novel is a collection of three linked novelettes that were not accepted for the magazine Astounding . The stories are sequels to Campbell's 1934 novel The Mightiest Machine .

Science fiction genre of fiction

Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, space exploration, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".

A fix-up is a novel created from several short fiction stories that may or may not have been initially related or previously published. The stories may be edited for consistency, and sometimes new connecting material, such as a frame story or other interstitial narration, is written for the new work. The term was coined by the science fiction writer A. E. van Vogt, who published several fix-ups of his own, including The Voyage of the Space Beagle, but the practice exists outside of science fiction. The use of the term in science fiction criticism was popularised by the first (1979) edition of the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, edited by Peter Nicholls, which credited Van Vogt with the creation of the term. The name comes from the modifications that the author needs to make in the original texts to make them fit together as though they were a novel. Foreshadowing of events from the later stories may be jammed into an early chapter of the fix-up, and character development may be interleaved throughout the book. Contradictions and inconsistencies between episodes are usually worked out.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1949.

Contents

Contents

Reception

Astounding reviewer P. Schuyler Miller found "The Incredible Planet" "a kind of bridge to the Don A. Stuart style which writer-editor Campbell [had been] developing." [1] Everett F. Bleiler thought the sequels "lack the strengths, such as they are, of The Mightiest Machine." [2]

P. Schuyler Miller American writer

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<i>King Conan</i> book by Robert E. Howard

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<i>The Legion of Space</i> book by Jack Williamson

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<i>Invaders from the Infinite</i> book by John W. Campbell

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<i>The Bridge of Light</i> book by Alpheus Hyatt Verrill

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<i>The Moon Is Hell!</i> book by John W. Campbell

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<i>The Crystal Horde</i> book by Eric Temple Bell

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<i>The Black Star Passes</i> book by John W. Campbell

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<i>Islands of Space</i> book by John W. Campbell

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<i>The Heads of Cerberus</i> book by Gertrude Barrows Bennett

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<i>The Abyss of Wonders</i> book by Perley Poore Sheehan

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<i>The Time Stream</i> book by Eric Temple Bell

The Time Stream is a science fiction novel by American writer John Taine. The novel was originally serialized in four parts in the magazine Wonder Stories beginning in December 1931. It was first published in book form in 1946 by The Buffalo Book Company in an edition of 2,000 copies of which only 500 were ever bound. It is the first novel to see time as a flowing stream.

<i>The Mightiest Machine</i> book by John W. Campbell

The Mightiest Machine is a science fiction novel by American writer John W. Campbell, Jr. The novel was originally serialized in 5 parts in Astounding Stories magazine from December 1934 to April 1935, and was published in book form in 1947 by The Hadley Publishing Co. in an edition of 1,200 copies. Campbell was a leading figure in the Golden Age of Science Fiction.

<i>The Blind Spot</i> book by Austin Hall

The Blind Spot is a science fiction novel by American writers Austin Hall and Homer Eon Flint. The novel was originally serialized in six parts in the magazine Argosy beginning in May 1921. It was first published in book form in 1951 by Prime Press in an edition of 1,500 copies, though fewer than 800 were bound and the remainder are assumed lost. The sequel, The Spot of Life, was written by Hall alone.

<i>The Iron Star</i> book by Eric Temple Bell

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<i>Drome</i> (novel) fantasy novel by John Martin Leahy

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<i>Miracle Science and Fantasy Stories</i> US pulp science fiction magazine

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History of US science fiction and fantasy magazines to 1950 Science fiction and fantasy magazine history

Science fiction and fantasy magazines began to be published in the United States in the 1920s. Stories with science fiction themes had been appearing for decades in pulp magazines such as Argosy, but there were no magazines that specialized in a single genre until 1915, when Street & Smith, one of the major pulp publishers, brought out Detective Story Magazine. The first magazine to focus solely on fantasy and horror was Weird Tales, which was launched in 1923, and established itself as the leading weird fiction magazine over the next two decades; writers such as H.P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith and Robert E. Howard became regular contributors. In 1926 Weird Tales was joined by Amazing Stories, published by Hugo Gernsback; Amazing printed only science fiction, and no fantasy. Gernsback included a letter column in Amazing Stories, and this led to the creation of organized science fiction fandom, as fans contacted each other using the addresses published with the letters. Gernsback wanted the fiction he printed to be scientifically accurate, and educational, as well as entertaining, but found it difficult to obtain stories that met his goals; he printed "The Moon Pool" by Abraham Merritt in 1927, despite it being completely unscientific. Gernsback lost control of Amazing Stories in 1929, but quickly started several new magazines. Wonder Stories, one of Gernsback's titles, was edited by David Lasser, who worked to improve the quality of the fiction he received. Another early competitor was Astounding Stories of Super-Science, which appeared in 1930, edited by Harry Bates, but Bates printed only the most basic adventure stories with minimal scientific content, and little of the material from his era is now remembered.

References

  1. "Book Reviews", Astounding, November 1950, p.94
  2. Everett F. Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Gernsback Years, Kent State University Press, 1998, p.59

Sources

Jack L. Chalker American author

Jack Laurence Chalker was an American science fiction author. Chalker was also a Baltimore City Schools history teacher in Maryland for 12 years, retiring during 1978 to write full-time. He also was a member of the Washington Science Fiction Association and was involved in the founding of the Baltimore Science Fiction Society.

Donald Henry Tuck was a bibliographer of science fiction, fantasy and weird fiction. His works were "among the most extensive produced since the pioneering work of Everett F. Bleiler."

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.