The Last Barricade

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The Last Barricade
Directed by Alex Bryce
Written byAlex Bryce
Robert Gore Brown
Lawrence Green
Produced byJohn Findlay
StarringFrank Fox
Greta Gynt
Meinhart Maur
Cinematography Stanley Grant
Production
company
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release date
17 October 1938
Running time
58 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

The Last Barricade is a 1938 British drama film directed by Alex Bryce and starring Frank Fox, Greta Gynt and Meinhart Maur. It was produced by the British subsidiary of 20th Century Fox at the company's Wembley Studios in London for release as a Quota Quickie. [1] The film's sets were designed by the art director Carmen Dillon.

Contents

Cast

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References

  1. Chibnall p.299

Bibliography