The Puppet Man

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The Puppet Man
Directed by Frank Hall Crane
Written by Cosmo Gordon Lennox (novel)
Produced by Edward Godal
Starring Hugh Miller
Molly Adair
Hilda Anthony
Production
company
Distributed byBritish and Colonial Films
Film Booking Offices of America (US)
Release date
August 1921
Running time
50 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Puppet Man is a 1921 British silent drama film directed by Frank Hall Crane and starring Hugh Miller, Molly Adair and Hilda Anthony. [1]

Contents

Cast

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References

  1. Low p.432

Bibliography