Thomas Pringle Award

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The Thomas Pringle Award is an annual award for work published in newspapers, periodicals and journals. They are awarded on a rotation basis for: a book, play, film or TV review; a literary article or substantial book review; an article on English education; a short story or one-act play; one or more poems. It is named in honour of Thomas Pringle and administered by the English Academy of South Africa. [1]

Thomas Pringle British writer

Thomas Pringle was a Scottish writer, poet and abolitionist. Known as the father of South African poetry, he was the first successful English language poet and author to describe South Africa's scenery, native peoples, and living conditions.

Contents

Award winners

Kelwyn Sole is a South African poet and academic.

Michiel Heyns is a South African author, translator and academic.

Stephen Watson (poet) South African poet

Stephen Watson was a South African poet.

See also

Notes

  1. http://www.englishacademy.co.za/awards.html
  2. http://bookslive.co.za/blog/2013/10/02/peter-dunseith-and-lauren-van-vuuren-receive-2013-english-academy-olive-schreiner-and-thomas-pringle-awards/
  3. http://test.englishacademy.co.za/wordpress/?page_id=304
  4. http://www.englishacademy.co.za/awards.html
  5. http://www.englishacademy.co.za/awards.html
  6. http://artsare.com/booknew/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=130

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