Thomas Simpson (architect of Nottingham)

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Shakespeare Street Wesleyan Reform Chapel 1854 Nottingham - NG1 - geograph.org.uk - 2950485.jpg
Shakespeare Street Wesleyan Reform Chapel 1854
Nottingham High School 1866-67 Nottingham High School.jpg
Nottingham High School 1866-67

Thomas Simpson (1816 - 16 March 1880) was an English architect based in Nottingham. [1]

Contents

Career

He married Charlotte Lovett (1819-1848) in the Wesleyan Chapel, Melton Mowbray and they had the following children:

He married Rebecca Goodacre (1820-1899) on 17 April 1849 in St Paul’s Church, Nottingham and they had the following child:

He represented St Mary’s Ward on the Nottingham Town Council, and later the Trent Ward. He died at his house in Baker Street, Nottingham on 16 March 1880. [2]

Notable works

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References

  1. Brodie, Antonia (20 December 2001). Directory of British Architects 1834-1914: Vol 2 (L-Z). Royal Institute of British Architects. p. 619. ISBN   082645514X.
  2. "Death of Mr. Thomas Simpson" . Nottingham Evening Post. England. 18 March 1880. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  3. Historic England. "Synagogue and attached area railings (1255018)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  4. "The New Street" . Nottingham Journal. England. 22 December 1862. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. Harwood, Elain (2008). Pevsner Architectural Guides. Nottingham. Yale University Press. p. 94. ISBN   9780300126662.
  6. "Nottingham Industrial Exhibition" . Nottingham Journal. England. 13 September 1865. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. Historic England. "Nottingham High School (1246248)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  8. "A New Methodist Free Church" . Nottingham Journal. England. 27 March 1869. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. "The New Mechanics' Hall and Rooms" . Nottingham Journal. England. 9 January 1869. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. "The New Methodist Free Church at Bye-Bank" . Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 10 June 1870. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. "Opening of a New Wesleyan Chapel in Nottingham" . Nottingham Journal. England. 20 September 1872. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  12. "Laying the memorial stone of a new Congregational school" . Nottingham Journal. England. 4 October 1874. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. "The proposed new Exeter Hall" . Nottingham Journal. England. 25 June 1874. Retrieved 27 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.