Thomas Stack

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Thomas Stack (died 1756) was an English physician and translator. He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1751, where he had been foreign secretary from 1748. [1]

Royal Society English learned society for science

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded on 28 November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society". It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement.

He translated the Medica Sacra of Richard Mead from Latin (1755). [2]

Richard Mead British physician

Richard Mead was an English physician. His work, A Short Discourse concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Method to be used to prevent it (1720), was of historic importance in the understanding of transmissible diseases.

Notes

  1. Charles Richard Weld (19 May 2011). A History of the Royal Society: With Memoirs of the Presidents. Cambridge University Press. p. 562. ISBN   978-1-108-02818-9.
  2. William Thomas Lowndes (1844*). The British Librarian; Or, Handbook for Students in Divinity, Etc. Thomas Rodd. p. 66.Check date values in: |date= (help)
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