Thomas Topping

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Captain Thomas Topping (1608 - December 1687) was a prominent early settler and government official in colonial Connecticut and Long Island. He was born in Totternhoe, Bedfordshire, and died in Branford, Connecticut. Topping participated in the establishment of Wethersfield, Connecticut and Milford, Connecticut. He is a named recipient of the 1662 Connecticut Charter from Charles II of England, with his last name spelled as "Tappen."

Totternhoe farm village in the United Kingdom

Totternhoe is a village and civil parish in the Manshead hundred of the county of Bedfordshire, England.

Bedfordshire County of England

Bedfordshire is a county in the East of England. It is a ceremonial county and a historic county, covered by three unitary authorities: Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, and Luton.

Branford, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Branford is a shoreline town located on Long Island Sound in New Haven County, Connecticut, 8 miles (13 km) east of New Haven. The population was 28,026 at the 2010 census.

Topping served as magistrate at Southampton, New York from 1650 to 1656, 1659 to 1662, and in 1664. He was the Southampton representative at Hartford from 1651 to 1653, 1655 to 1656, and from 1659 to 1663. Topping was the Southampton delegate to the 1665 Hempstead Convention.

Southampton, New York Town in New York, United States

Southampton, officially the Town of Southampton, is a town in southeastern Suffolk County, New York, partly on the South Fork of Long Island. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town had a population of 56,790. Southampton is included in the stretch of shoreline prominently known as The Hamptons.

The Hempstead Convention was a ten-day assembly where 34 delegates met starting on February 28, 1665, "to settle good and known laws" according to a letter by newly appointed Governor Richard Nicolls, the first English colonial governor of the Province of New York.

See also

History of the Connecticut Constitution

Connecticut is known as the "constitution state." The origin of this title is uncertain, but the nickname is assumed to be a reference to the Fundamental Orders of 1638–39 which represent the framework for the first formal government written by a representative body in Connecticut. Connecticut's government has operated under the direction of five separate documents in its history. The Connecticut Colony at Hartford was governed by the Fundamental Orders, and the Quinnipiac Colony at New Haven had its own Constitution in The Fundamental Agreement of the New Haven Colony which was signed on 4 June 1639.

Connecticut Colony English, from 1707, British, possession in North America between 1636 and 1776

The Connecticut Colony or Colony of Connecticut, originally known as the Connecticut River Colony or simply the River Colony, was an English colony in North America that became the state of Connecticut. It was organized on March 3, 1636 as a settlement for a Puritan congregation, and the English permanently gained control of the region in 1637 after struggles with the Dutch. The colony was later the scene of a bloody war between the colonists and Pequot Indians known as the Pequot War. Connecticut Colony played a significant role in the establishment of self-government in the New World with its refusal to surrender local authority to the Dominion of New England, an event known as the Charter Oak incident which occurred at Jeremy Adams' inn and tavern.

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