Thomas W. Bradshaw

Last updated
Thomas W. Bradshaw
33rd Mayor of Raleigh, North Carolina
In office
1971–1973
Preceded by Seby B. Jones
Succeeded by Clarence Lightner
Personal details
Born1938 (age 7980)

Thomas W. (Tom) Bradshaw, Jr. (born 1938) is a North Carolina businessman and public official. He was a member of the city council of Raleigh, and became the youngest mayor of Raleigh, serving for one term (1971-1973). Bradshaw later served as North Carolina Secretary of Transportation during the first term of Governor Jim Hunt (1977-1981). After his time in state government, he worked as managing director and co-head of the Transportation Group for Citigroup Global Markets. [1]

North Carolina State of the United States of America

North Carolina is a state in the southeastern region of the United States. It borders South Carolina and Georgia to the south, Tennessee to the west, Virginia to the north, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. North Carolina is the 28th-most extensive and the 9th-most populous of the U.S. states. The state is divided into 100 counties. The capital is Raleigh, which along with Durham and Chapel Hill is home to the largest research park in the United States. The most populous municipality is Charlotte, which is the second-largest banking center in the United States after New York City.

Raleigh, North Carolina Capital of North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. Raleigh is the second-largest city in the state, after Charlotte. Raleigh is known as the "City of Oaks" for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 142.8 square miles (370 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population as 479,332 as of July 1, 2018. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the country. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

The mayor of Raleigh is the mayor of Raleigh, the state capital of North Carolina, in the United States. Raleigh operates with council-manager government, under which the mayor is elected separately from Raleigh City Council, of which he or she is the eighth member.

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Bradshaw was a candidate for a seat in the North Carolina Senate in 2014. [2]

North Carolina Senate upper house of the bicameral North Carolina General Assembly

The North Carolina Senate is the upper chamber of the North Carolina General Assembly, which along with the North Carolina House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the North Carolina.

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