Thomas W. Schoener

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Thomas William Schoener (born August 9, 1943, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania) is an American ecologist and professor at University of California, Davis. In 1969, he received his Ph.D. from Harvard University, where he was a Junior Fellow. He served on the faculty at the University of Washington before moving to Davis. He is an expert in community ecology and in evolutionary ecology, including experimental manipulation of island vertebrate [1] and spider communities. Dr. Schoener's research has been both theoretical [2] and empirical.

Lancaster, Pennsylvania City in Pennsylvania, United States

Lancaster is a city located in South Central Pennsylvania which serves as the seat of Pennsylvania's Lancaster County and one of the oldest inland towns in the United States. With a population of 59,322, it ranks eighth in population among Pennsylvania's cities. The Lancaster metropolitan area population is 507,766, making it the 101st largest metropolitan area in the U.S. and second largest in the South Central Pennsylvania area.

University of California, Davis public university located in Davis, California, United States

The University of California, Davis, is a public research university and land-grant university adjacent to Davis, California. It is part of the University of California (UC) system and has the third-largest enrollment in the UC System after UCLA and UC Berkeley. The institution was founded as a branch in 1909 and became its own separate entity in 1959. It has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies", a publicly funded university considered to provide a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League.

Harvard University private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 post graduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.

He was the 1986 recipient of the Robert H. MacArthur Award given by the Ecological Society of America.

The Robert H. MacArthur Award is a biennial prize given by the Ecological Society of America to ecologists for their pivotal contributions to their field. The acceptance speeches of many recipients have been given at the annual meeting of the society and subsequently published in the ESA's Journal of Ecology.

Ecological Society of America ecological association

The Ecological Society of America (ESA) is a professional organization of ecological scientists. Based in the United States and founded in 1915, ESA publications include peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, fact sheets, and teaching resources. It holds an annual meeting at different locations in the USA and Canada. In addition to its publications and annual meeting, ESA is engaged in public policy, science, education and diversity issues.

He is a highly cited scientist. [3]

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This is a bibliography of ecology.

References

  1. Kolbe, J. J., M. Leal, T. W. Schoener, D. A. Spiller, and J. B. Losos. 2012. Founder effects persist despite adaptive differentiation: a field experiment with lizards. Science 335:1086–1089.
  2. Michael Turelli, John H. Gillespie, and Thomas W. Schoener. 1982. The fallacy of the fallacy of the averages in ecological optimization theory. American Naturalist 119:879–884.
  3. ISI Highly Cited