Thomas Whitgrave

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Thomas Whitgrave ( fl. 1650s) was the member of parliament for Staffordshire for the First, Second and Third Protectorate parliaments who was knighted by the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell in 1658. [1] [2] Although he was considered as a potential recipient Knight of the Royal Oak, the knighthood conferred by the Lord Protector was not recognised after the Restoration. [3]

Staffordshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament until 1832.

First Protectorate Parliament

The First Protectorate Parliament was summoned by the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell under the terms of the Instrument of Government. It sat for one term from 3 September 1654 until 22 January 1655 with William Lenthall as the Speaker of the House.

Second Protectorate Parliament

The Second Protectorate Parliament in England sat for two sessions from 17 September 1656 until 4 February 1658, with Thomas Widdrington as the Speaker of the House of Commons. In its first session, the House of Commons was its only chamber; in the second session an Other House with a power of veto over the decisions of the Commons was added.

Notes

  1. Noble 1784, p. 541.
  2. Shaw 1906, p. 224.
  3. R.R. 1859, p. 383.

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References

William Arthur Shaw (1865–1943) was an English historian and archivist.