Thomas Willis Pratt

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Thomas and Caleb's Pratt Truss Pratt truss.png
Thomas and Caleb's Pratt Truss

Thomas Willis Pratt, (born 1812, Boston, Massachusetts) [1] was an American engineer. He is best known for his 1844 patent for the Pratt truss, which he designed with his father, Caleb Pratt. [2] He died in 1875.

Engineer professional practitioner of engineering and its sub classes

Engineers, as practitioners of engineering, are professionals who invent, design, analyze, build, and test machines, systems, structures and materials to fulfill objectives and requirements while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, regulation, safety, and cost. The word engineer is derived from the Latin words ingeniare and ingenium ("cleverness"). The foundational qualifications of an engineer typically include a four-year bachelor's degree in an engineering discipline, or in some jurisdictions, a master's degree in an engineering discipline plus four to six years of peer-reviewed professional practice and passage of engineering board examinations.

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Scotland

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James Leal Greenleaf was an American landscape architect and civil engineer. Early in his career, he was a well-known landscape architect who designed the gardens and grounds of many large estates in Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York. He was appointed to the United States Commission of Fine Arts in 1918, and served until 1927. He was the landscape architect for the Lincoln Memorial, and a consulting landscape architect for the Arlington Memorial Bridge.

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References

  1. Evans, June; Evans, Benjamin. New England's Covered Bridges. University Press of New England. pp. Page 8. ISBN   1-58465-320-5.
  2. "Historic Bridges of Iowa" . Retrieved February 8, 2008.