Thomas baronets

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There have been six baronetcies created for persons with the surname Thomas, three in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Great Britain and two in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Two of the creations are extant as of 2016.

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The Thomas Baronetcy, of Michaelstown in the County of Glamorgan, was created in the Baronetage of England on 3 March 1642 for Edward Thomas. The second Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Cardiff. The title became extinct on his death sometime after 1684.

Cardiff was a parliamentary constituency centred on the town of Cardiff in South Wales which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons from 1542 until it was abolished for the 1918 general election.

The Thomas Baronetcy, of Folkington in the County of Sussex, was created in the Baronetage of England on 23 July 1660 for William Thomas, for many years Member of Parliament for Seaford and Sussex. The title became extinct on his death in 1706.

Sir William Thomas, 1st Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1661 to 1679, and from 1680 to 1706.

The UK parliamentary constituency of Seaford was a Cinque Port constituency, similar to a parliamentary borough, in Seaford, East Sussex. A rotten borough, prone by size to undue influence by a patron, it was disenfranchised in the Reform Act of 1832. It was notable for having returned three Prime Ministers as its members – Henry Pelham, who represented the town from 1717 to 1722, William Pitt the Elder from 1747 to 1754 and George Canning in 1827 – though only Canning was Prime Minister while representing Seaford.

Sussex was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Knights of the Shire, elected by the bloc vote system.

The Thomas Baronetcy, of Wenvoe in the County of Glamorgan, was created in the Baronetage of England on 24 December 1694 for John Thomas. The third Baronet represented Chippenham and Glamorganshire in the House of Commons. The tenth Baronet was admitted to the Privy Council in 1958.

Chippenham (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 2010 onwards

Chippenham is a parliamentary constituency, abolished in 1983 but recreated in 2010, and represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament by the first past the post system of election. The 2010 constituency includes the towns of Bradford on Avon, Chippenham, Corsham and Melksham.

Glamorganshire was a parliamentary constituency in Wales, returning two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the British House of Commons. The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 divided it into five new constituencies: East Glamorganshire, South Glamorganshire, Mid Glamorganshire, Gower and Rhondda.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

The Thomas Baronetcy, of Yapton in the County of Sussex, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 6 September 1766 for George Thomas, Governor of the Leeward Islands from 1753 to 1766. The third Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Arundel. The seventh Baronet was a prominent chess player. The title became extinct on his death in 1972.

Sir George Thomas, 1st Baronet was an English colonial government official, who served as Governor of the Leeward Islands.

Arundel was twice a parliamentary constituency in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. The first incarnation strictly comprised the town centre of Arundel and was a borough constituency in Sussex first enfranchised in 1332 and disfranchised in 1868 under the Reform Act 1867. Arundel initially elected two members, but this was reduced to one in 1832 by the Great Reform Act.

The Thomas Baronetcy, of Garreglwyd in the County of Anglesey, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 5 July 1918 for Robert Thomas. He was a ship and insurance broker and also represented Wrexham and Anglesey in the House of Commons.

Sir Robert Thomas, 1st Baronet British politician

Sir Robert John Thomas, 1st Baronet was a Welsh businessman and Liberal Party politician, who was twice elected to Parliament.

Wrexham (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Wrexham is a parliamentary constituency centred on the scenic town of Wrexham in Wales created in 1918 represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Ian Lucas of the Labour Party.

The Thomas Baronetcy, of Ynyshir in the County of Glamorgan, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 10 May 1919 for the coalowner and philanthropist James Thomas. He constructed the Welsh National Medical School in Cardiff and also served as High Sheriff of Glamorganshire in 1936. His son, the second Baronet, was a Deputy Lieutenant and High Sheriff for Monmouthshire. As of 2012 the title is held by the latter's son, the third Baronet, who succeeded in 2005.

Thomas baronets, of Michaelstown (1642)

Thomas baronets, of Folkington (1660)

Thomas baronets, of Wenvoe (1694)

Thomas baronets, of Yapton (1766)

Thomas baronets, of Garreglwyd (1918)

Thomas baronets, of Ynyshir (1919)

The heir presumptive to the baronetcy is Stephen Francis Thomas (born 1951), 2nd and youngest son of the 2nd Baronet and brother of the current occupant. His heir apparent is his eldest son, Toby James Thomas (born 1988).

Notes

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