Thomas de Montpellier

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Thomas de Montpellier (died after 1347) was a fourteenth-century Anglo-French judge and Crown official, much of whose career was spent in Ireland. He held a number of important lay and clerical offices including Dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland and, briefly, Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer. [1]

British people citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, British Overseas Territories, Crown Dependencies, and their descendants

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The French are an ethnic group and nation who are identified with the country of France. This connection may be ethnic, legal, historical, or cultural.

Ireland Island in north-west Europe, 20th largest in world, politically divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the UK)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

His family, who probably came to England from Montpellier in France in the late thirteenth century, had a tradition of service to Edward I; Thomas himself is recorded as being in the service of the Crown by 1307, and in his official capacity he visited Ireland on several occasions. [2] Peter de Montpellier, who was Royal Physician to the English Court from c.1303 to the end of the reign of Edward II, was probably Thomas's brother or cousin. [3]

Montpellier Prefecture and commune in Occitanie, France

Montpellier is a city near the south coast of France on the Mediterranean Sea. It is the capital of the Hérault department.It is located in the Occitanie region. In 2014, 589,610 people lived in the urban area and 275,318 in the city itself. Nearly one third of the population are students from three universities and from three higher education institutions that are outside the university framework in the city.

Edward II of England 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Edward II, also called Edward of Carnarvon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. The fourth son of Edward I, Edward became the heir apparent to the throne following the death of his elder brother Alphonso. Beginning in 1300, Edward accompanied his father on campaigns to pacify Scotland, and in 1306 was knighted in a grand ceremony at Westminster Abbey. Following his father's death, Edward succeeded to the throne in 1307. He married Isabella of France, the daughter of the powerful King Philip IV, in 1308, as part of a long-running effort to resolve tensions between the English and French crowns.

He became a prebendary in the Diocese of Ossory in 1318 and subsequently prebendary of Lusk; he was appointed Dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, about 1338.

A prebendary is a senior member of clergy, normally supported by the revenues from an estate or parish.

Lusk, Dublin Village in Leinster, Ireland

Lusk is a small town in Fingal, Ireland. The town is located about 23 km (14 mi) north of Dublin city centre.

He was appointed Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer in 1327 but seems only to have served for a few months. He was made Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer the following year. In 1335 he returned to the Court of Exchequer (Ireland) as second baron but quickly transferred to the Court of Common Pleas (Ireland). He went to England in 1341 and was removed from the Bench: whether this was at his own wish or not is unclear. [4] He was still Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral in 1347, but nothing seems to be known of him after that date.

Court of Exchequer (Ireland) senior court of common law in Ireland

The Court of Exchequer (Ireland) was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland. It was the mirror image of the equivalent court in England. The Court of Exchequer was one of the four royal courts of justice which gave their name to the building which is still called the Four Courts in Dublin.

Court of Common Pleas (Ireland)

The Court of Common Pleas was one of the principal courts of common law in Ireland. It was a mirror image of the equivalent court in England. It was one of the four courts of justice that gave the Four Courts in Dublin its name.

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References

  1. Ball, F. Elrington The Judges in Ireland 1221-1921 John Murray London 1926 Vol.i p.68
  2. Ball p.68
  3. Hamilton, J.S. Some Notes on "Royal" Medicine in the Reign of Edward II in "Fourteenth Century England" Chris Given-Wilson editor Boydell Press 2002 Vol.2 p.33
  4. Ball p.68