Thomas de Zengotita

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Thomas de Zengotita (born c. 1944) is an author and contributing editor at Harper's Magazine . He holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University and teaches at the Dalton School and New York University. His book Mediated: How the Media Shapes Your World and the Way You Live in It (2005) won the Marshall McLuhan award in 2006 and, in 2010. He co-wrote the narration for a film directed by Adrian Grenier entitled Teenage Paparazzo . [1]  

<i>Harpers Magazine</i>

Harper's Magazine is a monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts. Launched in June 1850, it is the second-oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the U.S.. Harper's Magazine has won 22 National Magazine Awards.

Anthropology is the scientific study of humans and human behavior and societies in the past and present. Social anthropology studies patterns of behaviour and cultural anthropology studies cultural meaning, including norms and values. Linguistic anthropology studies how language influences social life. Biological or physical anthropology studies the biological development of humans.

Columbia University Private Ivy League research university in New York City

Columbia University is a private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754, Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in New York and the fifth-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. It is one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence, seven of which belong to the Ivy League. It has been ranked by numerous major education publications as among the top ten universities in the world.

His most recent book, Postmodern Theory and Progressive Politics: Toward New Humanism was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2018. [2] He is presently at work on a book called Toward a New Foundation for Human Rights: a Phenomenological Approach which is due out in 2020 from Stanford University Press.

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References

  1. Teenage Paparazzo , retrieved 2018-08-29
  2. Postmodern Theory and Progressive Politics - Toward a New Humanism | Thomas de Zengotita | Palgrave Macmillan.
<i>The Brooklyn Rail</i> journal of arts, culture and politics

The Brooklyn Rail is a journal of arts, culture, and politics, currently published ten times a year, in Brooklyn, NY. The journal features in-depth interviews with artists, critics, and curators, as well as critical essays, fiction, poetry, and reviews of art, music, dance, film, books, and theater. The Brooklyn Rail is distributed in galleries, universities, museums, bookstores, and other organizations. The Rail operates a small press called Rail Editions, which publishes literary translations, poetry, and art criticism. In addition to its small press, the Rail has also organized panel discussions, readings, film screenings, music and dance performances, and has curated exhibitions through a program called Rail Curatorial Projects.