Thomas of Jorz

Last updated
Thomas of Jorz's coat of arms. COA Cardinal Thomas Jorz.svg
Thomas of Jorz's coat of arms.

Thomas of Jorz [2] (died at Grenoble, 13 December 1310) was an English Dominican theologian and cardinal.

Grenoble Prefecture and commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Grenoble is a city in southeastern France, at the foot of the French Alps where the river Drac joins the Isère. Located in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region, Grenoble is the capital of the department of Isère and is an important European scientific centre. The city advertises itself as the "Capital of the Alps", due to its size and its proximity to the mountains.

Dominican Order Roman Catholic religious order

The Order of Preachers, also known as the Dominican Order, is a mendicant Catholic religious order founded by the Spanish priest Dominic of Caleruega in France, approved by Pope Honorius III via the Papal bull Religiosam vitam on 22 December 1216. Members of the order, who are referred to as Dominicans, generally carry the letters OP after their names, standing for Ordinis Praedicatorum, meaning of the Order of Preachers. Membership in the order includes friars, nuns, active sisters, and affiliated lay or secular Dominicans.

Contents

Life

He entered the Order of Preachers in England, and was remarkable for his piety, erudition, and executive ability. He was master of theology at the University of Oxford, acted as prior of the Dominican convent there, and afterwards served as Provincial of the English Province for seven years (1296–1303).

University of Oxford Collegiate research university in Oxford, England

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two 'ancient universities' are frequently jointly referred to as 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

He stood in special favour with Edward I, King of England, acting as his confessor and executing several commissions for him. While at Lyons on a commission for the king, 15 December 1305, he was created Cardinal Priest of Santa Sabina by Pope Clement V. This pope also appointed him legate to Henry VII of Germany, but in fulfilling the appointment he was taken sick and died. His body was afterwards transferred to Oxford and buried under the choir of the Dominican church.

Pope Clement V pope

Pope Clement V, born Raymond Bertrand de Got, was Pope from 5 June 1305 to his death in 1314. He is remembered for suppressing the order of the Knights Templar and allowing the execution of many of its members, and as the Pope who moved the Papacy from Rome to Avignon, ushering in the period known as the Avignon Papacy.

Papal legate a personal representative of the pope

A papal legate or Apostolic legate is a personal representative of the pope to foreign nations, or to some part of the Catholic Church. He is empowered on matters of Catholic Faith and for the settlement of ecclesiastical matters.

Works

His writings are often confused with those of Thomas of Wales, O.P., also called Anglus or Anglicus. His most important work is Commentaria in IV libros Sententiarum. The commentary of the first book (Venice, 1523) still enjoys popularity, and offers a concise refutation of the attacks made by Duns Scotus on the teachings of Thomas Aquinas.

Duns Scotus Scottish Franciscan friar, philosopher and Catholic blessed

John Duns, commonly called Duns Scotus, a Scotsman, is generally considered to be one of the three most important philosopher-theologians of Western Europe in the High Middle Ages, together with Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham. Scotus has had considerable influence on both Catholic and secular thought. The doctrines for which he is best known are the "univocity of being", that existence is the most abstract concept we have, applicable to everything that exists; the formal distinction, a way of distinguishing between different aspects of the same thing; and the idea of haecceity, the property supposed to be in each individual thing that makes it an individual. Scotus also developed a complex argument for the existence of God, and argued for the Immaculate Conception of Mary.

Thomas Aquinas Dominican scholastic philosopher of the Roman Catholic Church

Saint Thomas Aquinas was an Italian Dominican friar, Catholic priest, and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher, theologian, and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism, within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis. The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio, Italy.

Related Research Articles

Pope Benedict XI 194th Pope of the Catholic Church

Pope Benedict XI, born Nicola Boccasini, was Pope from 22 October 1303 to his death on 7 July, 1304. He was also a member of the Order of Preachers.

Pope Boniface VIII 193rd Pope of the Catholic Church

Pope Boniface VIII was Pope from 24 December 1294 to his death in 1303.

Pope Boniface IX pope

Pope Boniface IX was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 2 November 1389 to his death in 1404. He was the second Pope of the Western Schism. During this time the papal claiments of the Avignon Obedience, antipope Clement VII and Benedict XIII, maintained the Roman Curia in Avignon, under the protection of the French monarchy.

Pope Gregory IX 178th Pope

Pope Gregory IX was Pope from 19 March 1227 to his death in 1241. He is known for issuing the Decretales and instituting the Papal Inquisition in response to the failures of the episcopal inquisitions established during the time of Pope Lucius III through his papal bull Ad abolendam issued in 1184.

Pope Innocent V pope

Pope Innocent V, born Pierre de Tarentaise, was pope from 21 January to 22 June 1276. He was a member of the Order of Preachers and was a close collaborator of Pope Gregory X during his pontificate. He was beatified in 1898 by Pope Leo XIII.

Thomas Wolsey 16th-century Archbishop of York, Chancellor of England, and cardinal

Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, Lord Chancellor of England, was an English bishop, statesman and a cardinal of the Catholic Church. When Henry VIII became King of England in 1509, Wolsey became the King's almoner. Wolsey's affairs prospered, and by 1514 he had become the controlling figure in virtually all matters of state and extremely powerful within the Church, as Archbishop of York, a cleric in England junior only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. His appointment in 1515 as a cardinal by Pope Leo X gave him precedence over all other English clerics.

Stephen Langton 13th-century Archbishop of Canterbury, theologian, and cardinal

Stephen Langton was an English Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and Archbishop of Canterbury between 1207 and his death in 1228. The dispute between King John of England and Pope Innocent III over his election was a major factor to the crisis which produced Magna Carta in 1215. Cardinal Langton is also credited with having divided the Bible into the standard modern arrangement of chapters used today.

Henry Beaufort 14th and 15th-century English prince, Bishop of Lincoln, then Winchester, Lord Chancellor of England, and cardinal

Cardinal Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester, was an English prelate and statesman who held the offices of Bishop of Lincoln (1398) then Bishop of Winchester (1404) and was from 1426 a Cardinal of the Church of Rome. He served three times as Lord Chancellor and played an important role in English politics.

Reginald Pole English cardinal, the last Roman Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury

Reginald Pole was an English cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and the last Roman Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury, holding the office from 1556 to 1558, during the Counter Reformation.

Pandulf Verraccio 13th-century Bishop of Norwich

Pandulf Verraccio, whose first name may also be spelled Pandolph or Pandulph, was a Roman ecclesiastical politician, papal legate to England and bishop of Norwich.

David Beaton Catholic cardinal

David Cardinal Beaton was Archbishop of St Andrews and the last Scottish Cardinal prior to the Reformation.

Giovanni Vitelleschi Catholic cardinal

Giovanni Maria Vitelleschi was an Italian cardinal and condottiere.

Lorenzo Campeggio Catholic cardinal

Lorenzo Campeggio (1474–1539) was an Italian cardinal and politician. He was the last cardinal protector of England.

William Petow was an English Franciscan friar and, briefly, a cardinal.

Thomas Stapleton (theologian) English Catholic controversialist

Thomas Stapleton was an English Catholic controversialist.

Annibale Annibaldi, also known as Annibaldo degli Annibaldi, was an Italian Catholic theologian,

Bernard Ayglerius was a French theologian, papal legate, and cardinal. He is sometimes known as Bernardus Cassinensis.

Thomas of Sutton was an English Dominican theologian, an early Thomist.

Richard de Morins also known as Ricardus Anglicus, Richard of Mores, Richard de Mores, Ricardus de Mores. (c.1161–1242) was an English canon lawyer. He was Archdeacon of Bologna, and taught law at the University of Bologna. On his return to England, he was a canon of Merton Priory, before becoming prior at Dunstable Priory in 1202.

William Grisaunt, also called William English, was an English physician.

References

  1. vitrail du Hall of Oxford University
  2. Often but erroneously called Joyce and frequently referred to as Angllus or Anglicus.

Touron is a derogatory term combining the words "Tourist" with "Moron" to describe any person who, while on vacation, commits an act of pure stupidity. The term is considered park ranger slang that describes how some tourists act when entering a national park. The phrase indicates an act of ignorance and is known to be used in different subcultures. It is also used to describe tourists in general when they are outside their normal "comfort zone".

Charles Lethbridge Kingsford, FBA was a scholarly English historian and author.

Thomas Tanner (bishop) Bishop of Saint Asaph and antiquarian

Thomas Tanner was an English antiquary and prelate.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Attribution

Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Thomas of Jorz". Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton.