Thompson and Epstein classification

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The Thompson and Epstein classification is a system of categorizing posterior fracture/dislocations of the hip. [1] [2]

Contents

Classification

Type Description
I with or without a minor fracture
II with a large single fracture of the posterior acetabular rim
III with comminution of the acetabular ring
IV with a fracture of the acetabular floor
V with a fracture of the femoral head

See also

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References

  1. Soloman, Louis (1 September 2010). Apley's System of Orthopaedics and Fractures (9th ed.). London: Hodder Education. p. 844. ISBN   9780340942055 . Retrieved 14 November 2014.
  2. Wheeless, Clifford R. "Posterior Frx Dislocations of the Hip". wheelessonline.com. Duke Orthopaedics. Retrieved 14 November 2014.