Thor-CD

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Thor-CD was a re-recordable CD format proposed in 1988 by Tandy. [1]

Tandy Corporation trading company

Tandy Corporation was an American family-owned leather goods company based in Fort Worth, Texas, United States. Tandy Leather was founded in 1919 as a leather supply store and acquired a number of craft retail companies, including RadioShack in 1963. In 2000, the Tandy Corporation name was dropped and the entity became the RadioShack Corporation.

Several years before recordable compact discs were introduced, Tandy Corporation announced a similar CD format named Thor-CD, [2] but after being pushed back for several years, it was finally cancelled due to steep manufacturing costs. [3]

CD-R compact disc format that can be written once and read arbitrarily many times

CD-R is a digital optical disc storage format. A CD-R disc is a compact disc that can be written once and read arbitrarily many times.

At the time Tandy proposed the new format, CDs were mostly used for digital music, but not for other digital data. Tandy aimed to change this with its new format.

However, the introduction of the CD-ROM format, which was incompatible with Tandy's proposal, all but killed Tandy's product.

CD-ROM pre-pressed compact disc

A CD-ROM is a pre-pressed optical compact disc that contains data. Computers can read—but not write to or erase—CD-ROMs, i.e. it is a type of read-only memory.

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References

  1. Lazzareschi, Carla (22 April 1988). "Tandy Develops a Compact Disc That's Erasable". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  2. Fasoldt, Al (1988). "Why Tandy's recordable CD is a breakthrough even if it never makes it to the market" . Retrieved 2006-03-06.
  3. Hayes, Thomas C. (27 October 1992). "Tandy Ventures Into the Unknown". The New York Times . Retrieved 5 February 2018. Its foray into compact digital recorders with a product known as Thor-CD fizzled because manufacturing costs were too steep.