Thorn tree

Last updated

Thorn tree may refer to:

<i>Acacia</i> genus of plants

Acacia, commonly known as the wattles or acacias, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the subfamily Mimosoideae of the pea family Fabaceae. Initially it comprised a group of plant species native to Africa and Australia, with the first species A. nilotica described by Linnaeus. Controversy erupted in the early 2000s when it became evident that the genus as it stood was not monophyletic, and that several divergent lineages needed to be placed in separate genera. It turned out that one lineage comprising over 900 species mainly native to Australia was not closely related to the mainly African lineage that contained A. nilotica—the first and type species. This meant that the Australian lineage would need to be renamed. Botanist Les Pedley named this group Racosperma, which was inconsistently adopted. Australian botanists proposed that this would be more disruptive than setting a different type species and allowing this large number of species to remain Acacia, resulting in the two African lineages being renamed Vachellia and Senegalia, and the two New World lineages renamed Acaciella and Mariosousa. This was officially adopted, but many botanists from Africa and elsewhere disagreed that this was necessary.

Thorntree

Thorntree is a housing estate in east Middlesbrough within the unitary authority of Middlesbrough and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. The population of this Middlesbrough ward taken at the 2011 census was 6,290. It is so called because it was built on land which was Thorntree Farm. It has a public park called Thorntree Park. The main roads of the estate are College Road and The Greenway.

Related Research Articles

<i>Crataegus</i> genus of plants

Crataegus, commonly called hawthorn, quickthorn, thornapple, May-tree, whitethorn, or hawberry, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the family Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. The name "hawthorn" was originally applied to the species native to northern Europe, especially the common hawthorn C. monogyna, and the unmodified name is often so used in Britain and Ireland. The name is now also applied to the entire genus and to the related Asian genus Rhaphiolepis.

Tracey Thorn English singer and songwriter

Tracey Anne Thorn is an English singer, songwriter and writer. She is best known as being one half of the duo Everything but the Girl.

Lonely Planet publisher of guidebooks and other media related to travel

Lonely Planet is a large travel guide book publisher. Other early books of the genre include Frommer's, Let's Go, the BIT Guides from 1970. As of 2011, the company had sold 120 million books since inception and by early 2014, it had sold around 11 million units of its travel apps.

Crown of thorns symbol and artifact in Christianity; one of the instruments of the passion

According to three of the synoptic Gospels, a woven crown of thorns was placed on the head of Jesus during the events leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus. It was one of the instruments of the Passion, employed by Jesus' captors both to cause him pain and to mock his claim of authority. It is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew, Mark (15:17), and John and is often alluded to by the early Church Fathers, such as Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and others.

<i>Crataegus monogyna</i> species of plant

Crataegus monogyna, known as common hawthorn, oneseed hawthorn, or single-seeded hawthorn, is a species of hawthorn native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia. It has been introduced in many other parts of the world. It can be an invasive weed.

Appleton Thorn village in United Kingdom

Appleton Thorn is a village in the borough of Warrington in Cheshire, England.

Glastonbury Thorn

The Glastonbury thorn is a form of common hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna 'Biflora', found in and around Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Unlike ordinary hawthorn trees, it flowers twice a year, the first time in winter and the second time in spring. The trees in the Glastonbury area have been propagated by grafting since ancient times. The tree is also widely called the holy thorn, though this term strictly speaking refers to the original (legendary) tree.

<i>Vachellia cornigera</i> species of plant

Vachellia cornigera, commonly known as Bullhorn Acacia, is a swollen-thorn tree native to Mexico and Central America. The common name of "bullhorn" refers to the enlarged, hollowed-out, swollen thorns that occur in pairs at the base of leaves, and resemble the horns of a steer. In Yucatán it is called "subín", in Panamá the locals call them "cachito". The tree grows to a height of 10 metres (33 ft). The Vachellia cornigera is typically found in woodland and great plains.

<i>Vachellia tortilis</i> species of plant

Vachellia tortilis, widely known as Acacia tortilis but attributed by APG III to the genus Vachellia, is the umbrella thorn acacia, also known as umbrella thorn and Israeli babool, a medium to large canopied tree native primarily to the savanna and Sahel of Africa, but also occurring in the Middle East.

<i>Vachellia erioloba</i> species of plant

Vachellia erioloba, still more commonly known as Acacia erioloba, is a tree of southern Africa in the family Fabaceae. Its preferred habitat is the deep dry sandy soils in parts of South Africa, Botswana, the western areas of Zimbabwe and Namibia. It is also native to Angola, south-west Mozambique, Zambia and Swaziland. The tree was first described by Ernst Heinrich Friedrich Meyer and Johann Franz Drège in 1836. The camel thorn is a protected tree in South Africa.

<i>Vachellia nilotica</i> species of plant

Vachellia nilotica is a tree in the family Fabaceae. It is native to Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. It is also a Weed of National Significance and is an invasive species of significant concern in Australia.

<i>Paliurus spina-christi</i> species of plant

Paliurus spina-christi, commonly known as Jerusalem thorn, garland thorn, Christ's thorn, or crown of thorns, is a species of Paliurus native to the Mediterranean region and southwest and central Asia, from Morocco and Spain east to Iran and Tajikistan.

"Chloe Dancer/Crown of Thorns" is a song by the Seattle, Washington-based rock band Mother Love Bone. The song is the fourth track on the band's debut EP, Shine (1989). "Chloe Dancer/Crown of Thorns" is actually two songs sequenced together. "Crown of Thorns" is found by itself on the band's sole studio album, Apple (1990). "Chloe Dancer" is not available as a stand-alone track.

My Pretty Rose Tree poem by William Blake

My Pretty Rose Tree is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794.

The Lilly poem written by the English poet William Blake

The Lilly is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794.

<i>Vachellia drepanolobium</i> species of plant

Vachellia drepanolobium, commonly known as whistling thorn, is a swollen-thorn acacia native to East Africa. The whistling thorn grows up to 6 meters tall. It produces a pair of straight thorns at each node, some of which have large bulbous bases. These swollen thorns are naturally hollow and occupied by any one of several symbiotic ant species. The common name of the plant is derived from the observation that when wind blows over bulbous thorns in which ants have made entry/exit holes, they create a whistling noise.

Salcombe Regis village in United Kingdom

Salcombe Regis is a coastal village in Devon, England, near Sidmouth. Mentioned in the Domesday Book as "a manor called Selcoma" held by Osbern FitzOsbern, bishop of Exeter, the manor house stood on the site now occupied by Thorn Farm. The thorn tree growing in an enclosure at the road junction above the farm marked the cultivation boundary between manor and common ground.

In plant morphology, thorns, spines, and prickles, and in general spinose structures, are hard, rigid extensions or modifications of leaves, roots, stems or buds with sharp, stiff ends, and generally serve the same function: physically deterring animals from eating the plant material. In common language the terms are used more or less interchangeably, but in botanical terms, thorns are derived from shoots, spines are derived from leaves, and prickles are derived from epidermis tissue.

<i>Ziziphus spina-christi</i> species of plant

Ziziphus spina-christi, known as the Christ's thorn jujube, is an evergreen tree or plant native to northern and tropical Africa, Southern and Western Asia. It is native to the regions Levant, East Africa and some tropical countries.