Thought blocking

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Thought blocking (German : Sperrung), [1] or simply blocking, is a phenomenon that occurs in people with psychiatric illnesses (usually schizophrenia). A person's speech is suddenly interrupted by silences that may last a few seconds to a minute or longer. [2] [3] When the person begins speaking again, after the block, they will often speak about a subject unrelated to what was being discussed when blocking occurred. Blocking is described as an experience of unanticipated, quick and total emptying of the mind. [4] People with schizophrenia commonly experience thought blocking and may comprehend the experience in peculiar ways. [4] For example, a person with schizophrenia might remark that another person has removed their thoughts from their brain. [4]

When doctors diagnose thought blocking, it is important that they consider other causes of pauses in speech and expression, such as petit mal or absence seizures, aphasia, hesitation brought on by anxiety, dissociation (e.g., secondary to PTSD), or slow thought processes. When looking for schizophrenia they may look for thought blocking. It is a common issue with schizophrenic patients. [5]

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The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is a publication for the classification of mental disorders using a common language and standard criteria. It is published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and is used by clinicians, researchers, psychiatric drug regulation agencies, health insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, the legal system, and policy makers.

Psychosis Condition of the mind that involves a loss of contact with reality

Psychosis is an abnormal condition of the mind that results in difficulties determining what is real and what is not. Symptoms may include false beliefs (delusions) and seeing or hearing things that others do not see or hear (hallucinations). Other symptoms may include incoherent speech and behavior that is inappropriate for the situation. There may also be sleep problems, social withdrawal, lack of motivation, and difficulties carrying out daily activities.

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Paranoid schizophrenia Delusions or auditory hallucinations of persecution or being plotted against

The term paranoid schizophrenia is no longer used in the United States since the 2013 change in the DSM-V that classifies the range of symptoms of former sub-types all under "schizophrenia". Schizophrenia is defined as "a chronic mental disorder in which a person is withdrawn from reality". Prior to 2013 schizophrenia had been divided into subtypes based on the "predominant symptomatology at the time of evaluation". The subtypes were classified as: paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated, and residual type. However, they are not completely separate diagnoses, and cannot predict the progression of the mental illness.

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Grandiose delusions Subtype of delusion

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References

  1. Lennart Jansson; Julie Nordgaard (2016). The Psychiatric Interview for Differential Diagnosis. Springer. p. 75. ISBN   978-3-319-33249-9.
  2. Nurcombe Barry, Ebert Michael H, "Chapter 4. The Psychiatric Interview" (Chapter). Ebert MH, Loosen PT, Nurcombe B, Leckman JF: CURRENT Diagnosis & Treatment: Psychiatry, p.2e: "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-22. Retrieved 2010-07-20.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link).
  3. "APA Dictionary of Psychology Blocking". dictionary.apa.org. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  4. 1 2 3 Gelder, Mayou, Geddes (2005). Psychiatry. New York, NY; Oxford University Press Inc.
  5. "National Institute of Mental Health". Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 2 October 2011.