Thousand-bomber raids

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Raids

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  1. "BBC - WW2 People's War - Timeline".

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Peter Stanley James

Wing Commander Peter Stanley James, was a pilot in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve during the Second World War, flying in RAF Bomber Command with No. 35 Squadron, No. 78 Squadron and No. 148 Squadron.

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