Three-island principle

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The Exeter City (1887) of the Bristol City Line was built using the three-island principle. Exeter City (1887).jpg
The Exeter City (1887) of the Bristol City Line was built using the three-island principle.

The three-island principle was a technique used in the construction of steel-hulled ships whereby a ship was built with a forecastle, bridge deck, and poop. [2] The technique allowed the economical and efficient construction of ships and was particularly common in tramp steamers and smaller vessels of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Knight of Malta, for instance, a 1929 steam ferry of only 16ft draught that operated between Malta and Sicily, was built on the principle. [3]

Forecastle upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast

The forecastle is the upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast, or the forward part of a ship with the sailors' living quarters. Related to the latter meaning is the phrase "before the mast" which denotes anything related to ordinary sailors, as opposed to a ship's officers.

Poop deck deck that forms the roof of a cabin built in the aft part of the superstructure of a ship

In naval architecture, a poop deck is a deck that forms the roof of a cabin built in the rear, or "aft", part of the superstructure of a ship.

See also

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William Pithie

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<i>Exeter City</i> (1887)

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References

  1. Greenway, Ambrose (2011). Cargo Liners: An Illustrated History. Barnsley: Seaforth Publishing. p. 15. ISBN   978-1-78346-929-1.
  2. Schäuffelen, Otmar (2005). Chapman Great Sailing Ships of the World. New York: Hearst Books. p. 293. ISBN   978-1-58816-384-4.
  3. Greenway, Ambrose (2013). Cross Channel and Short Sea Ferries: An Illustrated History. Barnsley: Seaforth Publishing. p. 123. ISBN   978-1-4738-4492-6.